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The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial located in front of the United States Capitol Building is a monument to Civil War General and 18th President of the United States, Ulysses Grant.  The monument sits by the Capitol Reflecting Pool and faces the Lincoln Memorial.  It is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States and the fourth largest in the world.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Gordon Meade Memorial is a monument dedicated to the Union General that defeated General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is interesting to note that following the end of the Civil War there was no enthusiasm for a monument to Meade, he was not a popular general, neither Lincoln nor Grant thought very highly of him.  However, around 1910, the Grand Army of the Republic asked his home state of Pennsylvania (where he was considered a hero) to raise money for a monument.  This statue was formally dedicated on October 19, 1927.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The General William Tecumseh Sherman Monument is a beautiful memorial located in Sherman Plaza near the White House and United States Treasury building.  The location for the monument was selected because this location is where Sherman, along with President Andrew Johnson and General Ulysses S. Grant reviewed the Army of the Potomac on May 23, 1865.  The following day Sherman led his men of the Army of the Tennessee past this same site.  It was dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt on October 15, 1903.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial located in front of the United States Capitol Building is a monument to Civil War General and 18th President of the United States, Ulysses Grant.  The monument sits by the Capitol Reflecting Pool and faces the Lincoln Memorial.  It is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States and the fourth largest in the world.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Close up view of the White House from the South Lawn.  The balcony was added to the White House in  1948, the rest of this view is what all Presidents since John Adams moved in in 1800.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The equestrian statue of Winfield Scott Hancock along Pennsylvania Avenue is a memorial to Union General Hancock.  The statue, which was sculpted by Henry Jackson Ellicott was commissioned on March 2, 1889 and dedicated on May 12, 1896.   Mike Lynaugh Photography If you look closely at this photo of the Washington Monument in Washington, DC, right under the American Flag, you'll see that the color of the stones is a different color than the stones on top of where the flag is located.  That is because this monument was being constructed prior to the Civil War, and construction was halted from 1854 - 1877 due to a lack of funds.  Fort Stevens is a Civil War fort that was built as part of the defenses of Washington, DC shortly after the Union's defeat at Manassas.  It was originally named Fort Massachusetts, but later named "Ft. Stevens" in honor of Brigadier General Isaac Ingalls Stevens who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly on September 1, 1862.  During the 1864 Union seige of Petersburg, General Lee tried to relieve some of the pressures on his army by sending General Jubal Early and his men north to attack the lightly defended Washington, DC.  Early was intercepted near Frederick, Maryland and due to what became known as the Battle of Monocacy, General Grant had enough time to dispatch reinforcements here to Ft. Stevens to help defend the capital from the assault.  During the two days of fighting here, President Lincoln traveled the short distance from the White House to this fort to observe the battle.  At one point he stood on this wall and came under direct fire from Confederate sharpshooters.  It is said that future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr, who was a soldier here, yelled at President Lincoln to "Get down, you fool!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Stevens is a Civil War fort that was built as part of the defenses of Washington, DC shortly after the Union's defeat at Manassas.  It was originally named Fort Massachusetts, but later named "Ft. Stevens" in honor of Brigadier General Isaac Ingalls Stevens who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly on September 1, 1862.  During the 1864 Union seige of Petersburg, General Lee tried to relieve some of the pressures on his army by sending General Jubal Early and his men north to attack the lightly defended Washington, DC.  Early was intercepted near Frederick, Maryland and due to what became known as the Battle of Monocacy, General Grant had enough time to dispatch reinforcements here to Ft. Stevens to help defend the capital from the assault.  During the two days of fighting here, President Lincoln traveled the short distance from the White House to this fort to observe the battle.  At one point he stood on this wall and came under direct fire from Confederate sharpshooters.  It is said that future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr, who was a soldier here, yelled at President Lincoln to "Get down, you fool!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Alexander Hamilton Stephens statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol was donated by the State of Georgia in 1927.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Edmund Kirby Smith statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of Confederate General Edmund Kirby Smith was donated to the Capitol in 1922 by the State of Florida.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis was donated to the Capitol in 1931 by the State of Mississippi.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of General Lee was donated to the Capitol in 1909 by the State of Virginia.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Gordon Meade Memorial is a monument dedicated to the Union General that defeated General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is interesting to note that following the end of the Civil War there was no enthusiasm for a monument to Meade, he was not a popular general, neither Lincoln nor Grant thought very highly of him.  However, around 1910, the Grand Army of the Republic asked his home state of Pennsylvania (where he was considered a hero) to raise money for a monument.  This statue was formally dedicated on October 19, 1927.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of President Abraham Lincoln resides in the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.  In 1866, the United States Congress selected 18 year-old sculptor Vinnie Ream to create a memorial to President Abraham Lincoln.  She became the first female artist commissioned to create a work of art for the United States government and the beautiful sculpture she created was placed on display here in the Capitol Rotunda in 1871.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of General Ulysses S. Grant resides in the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.  Sculptor Franklin Simmons was comissioned by the Grand Army of the Republic to sculpt a statue of General Grant to be gifted to Congress.  It is interesting to note that the first statue that Simmons created was not accepted because it was not a good likeness of Grant.  This second statue was submitted in 1899, and placed on display here in the rotunda in 1900.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial located in front of the United States Capitol Building is a monument to Civil War General and 18th President of the United States, Ulysses Grant.  The monument sits by the Capitol Reflecting Pool and faces the Lincoln Memorial.  It is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States and the fourth largest in the world.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A skull of an unknown Confederate soldier from the Civil War on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine when it was located at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  According to the sign under the skull it states: "Gunshot wounds to the skull were fatal in more than 80% of cases reported by Union surgons.  This skull, retrieved in 1866 from the Confederate trenches at Wilderness, Virginia, shows a gunshot wound.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The ribcage of Private Christian Birtsch on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine when it was located at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  According to the sign behind the ribs it states: "Gunshot wounds of the chest were difficult to treat because they often involved the lungs.  Private Christian Birtsch, age 50, Company B, 11th Pennsylvania, was shot through the chest at Hatcher's Run, Virginia, April 2nd, 1865 and he died from exhaustion twenty-six days later.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On July 2, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg, General Daniel Sickles was directing his 3rd Corps during an advance on the Confederate forces, when he was struck in the lower right leg by a 12 pound cannonball while riding his horse.  His leg was amputed by Surgeon Thomas Sim later that day.  Sickles was aware that the Army had recently started the Army Medical Museum and it was accepting "specimens of morbid anatomy" for preservation.  He ordered his tibia and fibula to be packed in a small coffin shaped box and sent to the museum.  Sickles recovered from his wounds and returned to duty, however he was known to visit his leg on the anniversary of it's amputation.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A skull of an unknown soldier from the Civil War on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine when it was located at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center.  According to the sign under the skull it states: "Skull, shot fracture and perforation, taken from the battlefield (Battle of the Wilderness), 1864.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is John Wilkes Booth's actual Philadelphia Deringer gun that he used to assasinate President Abraham Lincoln on April 14, 1865.  It is on display downstairs in the new museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is one of the pillows that President Lincoln rested on before dying from his wounds across the street at the Peterson House.  The pillow is still stained with President Lincoln's blood.  It is on display in the museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography This is an image of the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of General Lee was donated to the Capitol in 1909 by the State of Virginia.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail photo of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  This part of the monument is called Calvary Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Gordon Meade Memorial is a monument dedicated to the Union General that defeated General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is interesting to note that following the end of the Civil War there was no enthusiasm for a monument to Meade, he was not a popular general, neither Lincoln nor Grant thought very highly of him.  However, around 1910, the Grand Army of the Republic asked his home state of Pennsylvania (where he was considered a hero) to raise money for a monument.  This statue was formally dedicated on October 19, 1927.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography  The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Alexander Hamilton Stephens statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol was donated by the State of Georgia in 1927.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of General Lee was donated to the Capitol in 1909 by the State of Virginia.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of General Ulysses S. Grant resides in the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.  Sculptor Franklin Simmons was comissioned by the Grand Army of the Republic to sculpt a statue of General Grant to be gifted to Congress.  It is interesting to note that the first statue that Simmons created was not accepted because it was not a good likeness of Grant.  This second statue was submitted in 1899, and placed on display here in the rotunda in 1900.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Gordon Meade Memorial is a monument dedicated to the Union General that defeated General Robert E. Lee at the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is interesting to note that following the end of the Civil War there was no enthusiasm for a monument to Meade, he was not a popular general, neither Lincoln nor Grant thought very highly of him.  However, around 1910, the Grand Army of the Republic asked his home state of Pennsylvania (where he was considered a hero) to raise money for a monument.  This statue was formally dedicated on October 19, 1927.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Stephenson Grand Army of the Republic Memorial honors Dr. Benjamin F. Stephenson, the founder of the Grand Army of the Republic.  The GAR, as it was also called, was a fraternity open to all veterans who fought for the Union that were honorably discharged.  At it's peak the GAR grew to around 400,000 members.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The East Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of President Abraham Lincoln is the oldest memorial to the president.  It was dedicated on April 15, 1868, on the 3rd anniversary of Lincoln's assassination and President Andrew Johnson, General Ulysses S. Grant, General William T Sherman, and General Winfield Scott Hancock were all on hand for the dedication.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial located in front of the United States Capitol Building is a monument to Civil War General and 18th President of the United States, Ulysses Grant.  The monument sits by the Capitol Reflecting Pool and faces the Lincoln Memorial.  It is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States and the fourth largest in the world.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Stephenson Grand Army of the Republic Memorial honors Dr. Benjamin F. Stephenson, the founder of the Grand Army of the Republic.  The GAR, as it was also called, was a fraternity open to all veterans who fought for the Union that were honorably discharged.  At it's peak the GAR grew to around 400,000 members.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The General William Tecumseh Sherman Monument is a beautiful memorial located in Sherman Plaza near the White House and United States Treasury building.  The location for the monument was selected because this location is where Sherman, along with President Andrew Johnson and General Ulysses S. Grant reviewed the Army of the Potomac on May 23, 1865.  The following day Sherman led his men of the Army of the Tennessee past this same site.  It was dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt on October 15, 1903.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of President Abraham Lincoln resides in the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.  In 1866, the United States Congress selected 18 year-old sculptor Vinnie Ream to create a memorial to President Abraham Lincoln.  She became the first female artist commissioned to create a work of art for the United States government and the beautiful sculpture she created was placed on display here in the Capitol Rotunda in 1871.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Close up view of the White House from the South Lawn.  The balcony was added to the White House in  1948, the rest of this view is what all Presidents since John Adams moved in in 1800.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography A knife that was used by John Wilkes Booth during his assassination of President Lincoln.  According to the card on display, "Horn-handled dagger used by John Wilkes Booth to stab Major Henry Rathbone after shooting Abraham Lincoln.  The dagger is engraved with the words "Liberty" and "America".  This knife is on display in the museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography John Wilkes Booth's boot and spur that he wore the evening of April 14, 1865 during his assasination of President Lincoln.  Booth broke his leg during a jump from the president's box, however he escaped the theater and fled on horseback to Maryland with co-conspirator David Herold.  During their escape attempt they went to the home of Dr. Samuel Mudd and had Dr. Mudd care for Booth's leg.  This is the boot Booth was wearing, and you can see where Mudd cut it to help remove it over his swollen ankle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, while John Wilkes Booth was assasinating President Lincoln, he had co-conspirators around the city attempting to assasinate other high ranking members of Lincoln's cabinet.  Lewis Powell was sent to assasinate Secretary of State William Henry Seward.  When PowellPowell's gun, on display here at the museum at Ford's theater, misfired John Wilkes Booth's boot and spur that he wore the evening of April 14, 1865 during his assasination of President Lincoln.  Booth broke his leg during a jump from the president's box, however he escaped the theater and fled on horseback to Maryland with co-conspirator David Herold.  During their escape attempt they went to the home of Dr. Samuel Mudd and had Dr. Mudd care for Booth's leg.  These are the actual medical tools that Dr. Mudd used while working on Booth's broken leg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On the evning of April 14, 1865 John Wilkes Booth snuck into President Lincoln's booth while he was attending a play at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC and fired a single bullet into the back of the President's head.  President Lincoln would die a short time later.  This is the actual bullet that Booth assasinated President Lincoln with, and is labeled "The bullet that took the president's life."  It is on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On the evning of April 14, 1865 John Wilkes Booth snuck into President Lincoln's booth while he was attending a play at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC and fired a single bullet into the back of the President's head.  President Lincoln would die a short time later.  This is a cuff from the shirt of Edward Curtis who assisted in President Lincoln's autopsy stained with Lincoln's blood  It is on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On the evning of April 14, 1865 John Wilkes Booth snuck into President Lincoln's booth while he was attending a play at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC and fired a single bullet into the back of the President's head.  President Lincoln would die a short time later.  These are actual skull fragments from President Lincoln that were removed during his autopsy.  They are on display at the National Museum of Health and Medicine in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is one of the pillows that President Lincoln rested on before dying from his wounds across the street at the Peterson House.  The pillow is still stained with President Lincoln's blood.  It is on display in the museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the 150th Ohio National Guard is located in the Battleground National Cemtery near Fort Stevens in Washington, DC.  The cemtery was established shortly after the Battle of Fort Stevens in the summer of 1864.  The cemetery is located about one half mile north of Fort Stevens, and is one of the country's smallest national cemeteries.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Stevens is a Civil War fort that was built as part of the defenses of Washington, DC shortly after the Union's defeat at Manassas.  It was originally named Fort Massachusetts, but later named "Ft. Stevens" in honor of Brigadier General Isaac Ingalls Stevens who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly on September 1, 1862.  During the 1864 Union seige of Petersburg, General Lee tried to relieve some of the pressures on his army by sending General Jubal Early and his men north to attack the lightly defended Washington, DC.  Early was intercepted near Frederick, Maryland and due to what became known as the Battle of Monocacy, General Grant had enough time to dispatch reinforcements here to Ft. Stevens to help defend the capital from the assault.  During the two days of fighting here, President Lincoln traveled the short distance from the White House to this fort to observe the battle.  At one point he stood on this wall and came under direct fire from Confederate sharpshooters.  It is said that future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr, who was a soldier here, yelled at President Lincoln to "Get down, you fool!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The lobby of the Willard Hotel which is located near the White House.  While in office, President Grant loved to visit this hotel and sit in this lobby and enjoy his cigars and brandy.  People started learning that the President would be here and began hounding him for favors.  The story is that he coined the term "lobbyist" when he apparently called them, "those damn lobbyists".   Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The East Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC where President Abraham Lincoln gave his famous 2nd Inaugural Address here on these steps.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Green Room in the White House is typically used for small receptions or as a parlor to serve cocktails to guests during a State Dinner before the President and First Lady descend the staircase from the residence.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Close up view of the White House from the South Lawn.  The balcony was added to the White House in  1948, the rest of this view is what all Presidents since John Adams moved in in 1800.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Alexander Hamilton Stephens statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol was donated by the State of Georgia in 1927.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of Confederate President Jefferson Davis was donated to the Capitol in 1931 by the State of Mississippi.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of General Lee was donated to the Capitol in 1909 by the State of Virginia.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee statue in the National Statuary Hall in the United States Capitol Building.  The statue of General Lee was donated to the Capitol in 1909 by the State of Virginia.  Statuary Hall is also known as the "Old Hall of the House" and was the home of the U.S. House of Representatives from 1807 - 1857.  The statues on display here were donated by individual states to honor their most notable citizens.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the 25th New York Volunteer Cavalry is located in the Battleground National Cemtery near Fort Stevens in Washington, DC.  The cemtery was established shortly after the Battle of Fort Stevens in the summer of 1864.  The cemetery is located about one half mile north of Fort Stevens, and is one of the country's smallest national cemeteries.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography A life mask made of President Abraham lincoln by artist Clark Mills in February 1865 on display at the Ford's Theater Museum The General William Tecumseh Sherman Monument is a beautiful memorial located in Sherman Plaza near the White House and United States Treasury building.  The location for the monument was selected because this location is where Sherman, along with President Andrew Johnson and General Ulysses S. Grant reviewed the Army of the Potomac on May 23, 1865.  The following day Sherman led his men of the Army of the Tennessee past this same site.  It was dedicated by President Theodore Roosevelt on October 15, 1903.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail photo of the Ulysses S. Grant Memorial near the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  This part of the monument is called Calvary Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of General Ulysses S. Grant resides in the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.  Sculptor Franklin Simmons was comissioned by the Grand Army of the Republic to sculpt a statue of General Grant to be gifted to Congress.  It is interesting to note that the first statue that Simmons created was not accepted because it was not a good likeness of Grant.  This second statue was submitted in 1899, and placed on display here in the rotunda in 1900.   Mike Lynaugh Photography After President Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth, he was brought into the Peterson House across the street from the theater while being attended by doctors and staff.  It was in this home that the President died at 7:22am on April 15, 1865, at the age of 56.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A mural in the United States Capitol Building showing the interior of the Capitol Rotunda when it was used as a Civil War hospital from 1861 - 1862.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography The West Front of the United States Capitol Building in Washington, DC.  During the Civil War the Capitol Building was used briefly as a military barracks and hospital and was the site of President Lincoln's famous 2nd Inaugural Address.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive statue of Abraham Lincoln in the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC.  The statue of President Lincoln stands 29 feet tall (President Lincoln is 19 feet from head to toe, and the base is 10 feet tall).    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Ulysses S. Grant Memorial located in front of the United States Capitol Building is a monument to Civil War General and 18th President of the United States, Ulysses Grant.  The monument sits by the Capitol Reflecting Pool and faces the Lincoln Memorial.  It is the second largest equestrian statue in the United States and the fourth largest in the world.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A view of the White House from the North Lawn.  This view is what all Presidents since John Adams moved in in 1800 (minus the fence).   Mike Lynaugh Photography The top of the rotunda of the United States Capitol Building.   This is looking up into what would be viewed as the Capitol Building Dome from outside the building.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Stephenson Grand Army of the Republic Memorial honors Dr. Benjamin F. Stephenson, the founder of the Grand Army of the Republic.  The GAR, as it was also called, was a fraternity open to all veterans who fought for the Union that were honorably discharged.  At it's peak the GAR grew to around 400,000 members.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Washington Monument in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This unassuming little white house, which is now a Chinese resturant, was once the home of Lincoln Assassination conspirator Mary E. Surratt.  It was known as the Marry Surratt Boarding House and it is believed to be where John Wilkes Booth and the other conspirators came up with the plan to assassinate President Lincoln.   Mike Lynaugh Photography After President Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth, he was brought into the Peterson House across the street from the theater while being attended by doctors and staff.  It was in this home that the President died at 7:22am on April 15, 1865, at the age of 56.   Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This pine bar from a wodden music stand was used by John Wilkes Booth, once he entered President Lincoln's booth at Ford's Theater, to barricade the door so it would be difficult for people to come to the aid of the President following the assassination.  It is on display in the museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Major Rathbone was in President Lincoln's booth while he was assassinated by John Wilkes Booth.....he was wearing these gloves at the time when he tried to stop Booth before getting stabbed in the arm by Booth.  It is on display in the museum at Ford's Theater in Washington, DC.  Mike Lynaugh Photography On April 14, 1865, just five days following General Lee's surrender at Appomattox, here in Ford's Theater, President Abraham Lincoln attended the play "Our American Cousin" with his wife and friends, and was assassinated by the Confederate sympathizer John Wilkes Booth.  President Lincoln was sitting in the balcony draped with American flags and a portrait of George Washington.  The booth has been restored to look as it did that fateful evening.  Mike Lynaugh Photography After President Lincoln was shot by John Wilkes Booth, he was brought into the Peterson House across the street from the theater while being attended by doctors and staff.  This is the actual table this Lincoln's son, Robert and wife, Mary, waited at inbetween visited to his bedside before his death.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Stevens is a Civil War fort that was built as part of the defenses of Washington, DC shortly after the Union's defeat at Manassas.  It was originally named Fort Massachusetts, but later named "Ft. Stevens" in honor of Brigadier General Isaac Ingalls Stevens who was killed at the Battle of Chantilly on September 1, 1862.  During the 1864 Union seige of Petersburg, General Lee tried to relieve some of the pressures on his army by sending General Jubal Early and his men north to attack the lightly defended Washington, DC.  Early was intercepted near Frederick, Maryland and due to what became known as the Battle of Monocacy, General Grant had enough time to dispatch reinforcements here to Ft. Stevens to help defend the capital from the assault.  During the two days of fighting here, President Lincoln traveled the short distance from the White House to this fort to observe the battle.  At one point he stood on this wall and came under direct fire from Confederate sharpshooters.  It is said that future Supreme Court Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes Jr, who was a soldier here, yelled at President Lincoln to "Get down, you fool!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the 122nd New York Volunteer Infantry is located in the Battleground National Cemtery near Fort Stevens in Washington, DC.  The cemtery was established shortly after the Battle of Fort Stevens in the summer of 1864.  The cemetery is located about one half mile north of Fort Stevens, and is one of the country's smallest national cemeteries.   Mike Lynaugh Photography jQuery Images by VisualLightBox.com v5.3m