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The statue to General Stonewall Jackson on Monument Avenue in Richmond is a 37 foot tall bronze equestrian statue which was planned on November 29, 1911 and dedicated on October 11, 1919.  In attendence for the unveiling was Robert E. Lee's grandson and Jackson's grandaughter, who along with the sculptor's son, pulled the ropes unveiling it.  A parade of VMI cadets, Virginia National Guardsmen, and school children marched in a parade to the site.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart was the 2nd Confederate statue to be unveiled on Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA.  Originally planned in 1875, however the competition for creating this memorial was not held until 1903.  It was sculpted by Frederick Moynihan and dedicated in 1907, the same day as the Jefferson Davis Statue, in front of an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 people, including 18,000 Confederate veterans who camped out for the week.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was unveiled on June 3, 1907 (the same day as the JEB Stuart Monument) in front of a crowd estimated to be between 80,000 and 200,000, including 18,000 Confederate Veterans that had camped out for the event.  The monument has 13 pillars representing the 11 states that formed the Confederacy and the states that sent troops to support the Conderate cause.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail image of the grave of Jefferson Davis, the President of the Confederate States of America at the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of Varina Anne Davis at the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.  She was the wife of Jefferson Davis, who served as President of the Confederate States of America, and who served as First Lady of the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Garland Rodes Camp, Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #409, march past the General Robert E. Lee Monument on Monument Avenue during the Confederate Heritage Parade in Richmond, VA in 2004.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart was the 2nd Confederate statue to be unveiled on Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA.  Originally planned in 1875, however the competition for creating this memorial was not held until 1903.  It was sculpted by Frederick Moynihan and dedicated in 1907, the same day as the Jefferson Davis Statue, in front of an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 people, including 18,000 Confederate veterans who camped out for the week.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The James River Rangers lead the way down Monument Avenue during the Confederate Heritage Parade  in Richmond, VA in 2004.   Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful memorials at the Hollywood Cemtery in Richmond, Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Grave of Fitzhugh Lee in Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.  He was a former Major General in both the Confederate States of America, and the United States of America, he was nephew to General Robert E. Lee, and went on to become the 40th Governor of Virginia from 1886 - 1890.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of Varina Anne Davis at the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.  She was the wife of Jefferson Davis, who served as President of the Confederate States of America, and who served as First Lady of the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of Alice Russell Hotchkiss at the Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA who died of illness at the age of 23 in 1903.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Shirley Plantation is the oldest active plantation in Virginia and is the oldest family run buisness in North America.  The plantation, which is located just outside of Richmond, VA, dates back to 1614 and started operations in 1648.  The Hill Carter family currently owns this plantation, and has owned it continuously since 1738.  During the plantation's history, between 70 and 90 slaves were present here.  Ann Hill Carter was born here, and in 1993 she married "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the parlor of the mansion.  On January 19, 1807, they gave birth to the future Confederate General, Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The only remaining original slave house from Shirley Plantation.  The Shirley Plantation is the oldest active plantation in Virginia and is the oldest family run buisness in North America.  The plantation, which is located just outside of Richmond, VA, dates back to 1614 and started operations in 1648.  The Hill Carter family currently owns this plantation, and has owned it continuously since 1738.  During the plantation's history, between 70 and 90 slaves were present here.  Ann Hill Carter was born here, and in 1993 she married "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the parlor of the mansion.  On January 19, 1807, they gave birth to the future Confederate General, Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  This home is located behind the Half-Way House which was the former headquarters of Major-General B. F. Butler's Union Army of the James during the Battle of Drewry's Bluff on May 16, 1864.  The Inn that is in front of this building was names the Halfway House becaue it is just about midway between Richmond and Petersburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Robert E. Lee's home in Richmond, Virginia.  It was built in 1844, and in 1864 General Robert E, Lee's wife and daughter occupided the house following the confiscation of their home in Arlington, Virginia (now a centerpiece at Arlington National Cemetery).  Following Lee's surrender at Appomattox he returned to this home and stayed here until June 1865, when he had to leave because of "constant callers".  Photographer Matthew Brady visited General Lee at this home following the war and created some of his best images of the General and his sons in the yard behind this home.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The statue to General Stonewall Jackson on Monument Avenue in Richmond is a 37 foot tall bronze equestrian statue which was planned on November 29, 1911 and dedicated on October 11, 1919.  In attendence for the unveiling was Robert E. Lee's grandson and Jackson's grandaughter, who along with the sculptor's son, pulled the ropes unveiling it.  A parade of VMI cadets, Virginia National Guardsmen, and school children marched in a parade to the site.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart was the 2nd Confederate statue to be unveiled on Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA.  Originally planned in 1875, however the competition for creating this memorial was not held until 1903.  It was sculpted by Frederick Moynihan and dedicated in 1907, the same day as the Jefferson Davis Statue, in front of an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 people, including 18,000 Confederate veterans who camped out for the week.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart was the 2nd Confederate statue to be unveiled on Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA.  Originally planned in 1875, however the competition for creating this memorial was not held until 1903.  It was sculpted by Frederick Moynihan and dedicated in 1907, the same day as the Jefferson Davis Statue, in front of an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 people, including 18,000 Confederate veterans who camped out for the week.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was unveiled on June 3, 1907 (the same day as the JEB Stuart Monument) in front of a crowd estimated to be between 80,000 and 200,000, including 18,000 Confederate Veterans that had camped out for the event.  The monument has 13 pillars representing the 11 states that formed the Confederacy and the states that sent troops to support the Conderate cause.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Richmond's Old City Hall served as City Hall from 1894 - 1970's.  It is located directly behind the Virginia State Capitol building.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Washington Monument on the grounds of the Virginia State Capitol building.  It was the 2nd equestrian statue of Washington to be unveiled in the United States (the first one being at Union Square in NYC in 1856), and was completed in 1869.  The base of the monument, which was completed following the Civil War, includes six other Virginians who took part in the American Revolution: Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Andrew Lewis, John Marshall, George Mason and Thomas Nelson Jr.  On February 22, 1862 this monument was used as a location for the second inauguration of the President and Vice President of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, and Alexander Stephens, and an image of this statue was incorporated into the official seal of the Confederate States of America.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A statue of Confederate General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson on the grounds of the Virginia State Capitol building is a bronze 7 foot high statue that was dedicated on October 26, 1875.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This building, which is known as the White House of the Confederacy is the home where Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis lived during the Civil War.  Davis occupied this house from August 1861 until he evacuated Richmond in April 1865.  During the War he hosted many meetings here and met with Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, among many others.  Following the fall of Richmond President Abraham Lincoln visited this historic home, and since the late 1800's it has been preserved as a museum and looks as it did when Davis and his family lived here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The bust of General JEB Stuart which is on display in the Old Hall in the Virginia State Capitol building.  It was in this room that the Virginia Secession Convention of 1861 met here during part of its first session, and where General Robert E. Lee accepted command of all Confederate forces.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The full-length, life sized bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee on display in the Old Hall in the Virginia State Capitol building is located in the exact location the general stood when he accepted command of all Confederate forces on April 23, 1861.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The outside of the former home of the Museum of the Confederacy.  The original "Confederate Museum" opened next door to this building in the White House of the Confederacy in 1896, the home to Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his family throughout the Civil War.  In 1976 the museum moved into this 31,000 square foot building so they could showcase more of their collection of original artifacts.  The most famous of their items is the sword and uniform worn by General Robert E. Lee when he surrendered at Appomattox Court House to General Grant.  The museum also had original uniforms and other personal items on display for General Stonewall Jackson, General JEB Stuart, General George Pickett, and many others.  This museum closed its doors in 2018 and the collection has moved to the new American Civil War Center at the location of the former Tredegar Ironworks.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The gravesite of Confederate General James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart.  General Stuart served as head of the Calvary in the Confederate Army under the command of General Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The gravesite of General Longstreet's three youngest chidren, Mary Ann, James Jr. and Augustus Bladwin Longstreet who all died within a few months of each other in 1862 of Scarlet Fever.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The gravesite of Confederate General James Ewell Brown "Jeb" Stuart.  General Stuart served as head of the Calvary in the Confederate Army under the command of General Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of the famous author and historian Douglas Southall Freeman at Hollywood Cemtery in Richmond, VA.  Southall Freeman is best known for his biographies of General Robert E. Lee and George Washington, both of which won him a Pulitzer Prize.  His father served four years in General Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail of the Virginia Washington Monument on the grounds of the Virginia State Capitol building.  It was the 2nd equestrian statue of Washington to be unveiled in the United States (the first one being at Union Square in NYC in 1856), and was completed in 1869.  The base of the monument, which was completed following the Civil War, includes six other Virginians who took part in the American Revolution: Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Andrew Lewis, John Marshall, George Mason and Thomas Nelson Jr.  On February 22, 1862 this monument was used as a location for the second inauguration of the President and Vice President of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, and Alexander Stephens, and an image of this statue was incorporated into the official seal of the Confederate States of America.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Governor's Executive Mansion which has been the home to Virginia's governors since 1813 and is the oldest governor's residence in the country still used for its original purpose.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Robert E. Lee's home in Richmond, Virginia.  It was built in 1844, and in 1864 General Robert E, Lee's wife and daughter occupided the house following the confiscation of their home in Arlington, Virginia (now a centerpiece at Arlington National Cemetery).  Following Lee's surrender at Appomattox he returned to this home and stayed here until June 1865, when he had to leave because of "constant callers".  Photographer Matthew Brady visited General Lee at this home following the war and created some of his best images of the General and his sons in the yard behind this home.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Washington statue by Jean-Antoine Houdon is considered one of the most accurate depections of George Washington.  It was commisioned by the Virginia General Assembly in 1784 and delivered in 1796.  This marble statue weighs 18 tons and sits in the rotunda in the Virginia State Capitol building in Richmond, VA.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate War Dead at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia is a 90 foot pyramid which overlooks the cemetery's Soldiers' Section.  It is a monument to the 18,000 former Confederate elisted men buried in the cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Iron Dog is one of the most well known monuments at Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, VA.  The dog stands guard over the grave of a little girl who died here in Richmond in 1862.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The statue of President Abraham Lincoln at Tredegar.  This statue was placed at the sites of the Tredegar Iron Works on April 3, 2003 and is a life size depiction that shows President Lincoln and his 12 year-old son Tad, sitting on a bench during their historic visit to Richmond in April 1865 as they toured the burned-out former Capitol of the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This building, which is known as the White House of the Confederacy is the home where Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis lived during the Civil War.  Davis occupied this house from August 1861 until he evacuated Richmond in April 1865.  During the War he hosted many meetings here and met with Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, among many others.  Following the fall of Richmond President Abraham Lincoln visited this historic home, and since the late 1800's it has been preserved as a museum and looks as it did when Davis and his family lived here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A canon on the Malvern Hill battlefield.    On July 1, 1862 the Army of Northern Virginia, led by General Robert E. Lee and General George McClellan's Army of the Potomac met here during the final battle of the Seven Days campaign where McClellan's attempted attack on Richmond was finally repulsed here.     Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography This building, which is known as the White House of the Confederacy is the home where Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis lived during the Civil War.  Davis occupied this house from August 1861 until he evacuated Richmond in April 1865.  During the War he hosted many meetings here and met with Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, among many others.  Following the fall of Richmond President Abraham Lincoln visited this historic home, and since the late 1800's it has been preserved as a museum and looks as it did when Davis and his family lived here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The outside of the former home of the Museum of the Confederacy.  The original "Confederate Museum" opened next door to this building in the White House of the Confederacy in 1896, the home to Confederate President Jefferson Davis and his family throughout the Civil War.  In 1976 the museum moved into this 31,000 square foot building so they could showcase more of their collection of original artifacts.  The most famous of their items is the sword and uniform worn by General Robert E. Lee when he surrendered at Appomattox Court House to General Grant.  The museum also had original uniforms and other personal items on display for General Stonewall Jackson, General JEB Stuart, General George Pickett, and many others.  This museum closed its doors in 2018 and the collection has moved to the new American Civil War Center at the location of the former Tredegar Ironworks.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was unveiled on June 3, 1907 (the same day as the JEB Stuart Monument) in front of a crowd estimated to be between 80,000 and 200,000, including 18,000 Confederate Veterans that had camped out for the event.  The monument has 13 pillars representing the 11 states that formed the Confederacy and the states that sent troops to support the Conderate cause.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Hollywood Cemetery in Richmond, Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A statue of Richmond native Edgar Allan Poe sitting in a chair, he is holding a pen in one hand and some paper in the other.  It was dedicated on October 7, 1959.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A fountain on the grounds of the Virginia State Capitol Building, known as Capitol Square.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of Virginia Blow Hoff at Richmond, Virginia's beautiful Hollywood Cemtery.   Mike Lynaugh Photograpy The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Shirley Plantation is the oldest active plantation in Virginia and is the oldest family run buisness in North America.  The plantation, which is located just outside of Richmond, VA, dates back to 1614 and started operations in 1648.  The Hill Carter family currently owns this plantation, and has owned it continuously since 1738.  During the plantation's history, between 70 and 90 slaves were present here.  Ann Hill Carter was born here, and in 1993 she married "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the parlor of the mansion.  On January 19, 1807, they gave birth to the future Confederate General, Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail photo of the statue of President Abraham Lincoln at Tredegar.  This statue was placed at the sites of the Tredegar Iron Works on April 3, 2003 and is a life size depiction that shows President Lincoln and his 12 year-old son Tad, sitting on a bench during their historic visit to Richmond in April 1865 as they toured the burned-out former Capitol of the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A view of the Richmond skyline from across the James River.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was unveiled on June 3, 1907 (the same day as the JEB Stuart Monument) in front of a crowd estimated to be between 80,000 and 200,000, including 18,000 Confederate Veterans that had camped out for the event.  The monument has 13 pillars representing the 11 states that formed the Confederacy and the states that sent troops to support the Conderate cause.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Jefferson Davis Memorial on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia was unveiled on June 3, 1907 (the same day as the JEB Stuart Monument) in front of a crowd estimated to be between 80,000 and 200,000, including 18,000 Confederate Veterans that had camped out for the event.  The monument has 13 pillars representing the 11 states that formed the Confederacy and the states that sent troops to support the Conderate cause.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Washington Monument on the grounds of the Virginia State Capitol building.  It was the 2nd equestrian statue of Washington to be unveiled in the United States (the first one being at Union Square in NYC in 1856), and was completed in 1869.  The base of the monument, which was completed following the Civil War, includes six other Virginians who took part in the American Revolution: Thomas Jefferson, Patrick Henry, Andrew Lewis, John Marshall, George Mason and Thomas Nelson Jr.  On February 22, 1862 this monument was used as a location for the second inauguration of the President and Vice President of the Confederacy, Jefferson Davis, and Alexander Stephens, and an image of this statue was incorporated into the official seal of the Confederate States of America.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Confederate General J.E.B. Stuart was the 2nd Confederate statue to be unveiled on Monument Avenue in Richmond, VA.  Originally planned in 1875, however the competition for creating this memorial was not held until 1903.  It was sculpted by Frederick Moynihan and dedicated in 1907, the same day as the Jefferson Davis Statue, in front of an estimated 80,000 to 200,000 people, including 18,000 Confederate veterans who camped out for the week.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A view of the Richmond skyline from across the James River.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Historic Slave Trail in Richmond, Virginia is a walking trail that traces the history of the trade of enslaved Africans from Africa to Virginia.  The trail begins at the Manchester Docks, which was a major port for the slave trade that made Richmond the largest source of enslaved Africans on the east coast from 1830 to 1860.  It then follows the path the slaves would have travelled through the slave markets of Richmond, past the Reconciliation Statue, Lumpkin's Slave Jail, and the Slave burial ground.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The only remaining original slave house from Shirley Plantation.  The Shirley Plantation is the oldest active plantation in Virginia and is the oldest family run buisness in North America.  The plantation, which is located just outside of Richmond, VA, dates back to 1614 and started operations in 1648.  The Hill Carter family currently owns this plantation, and has owned it continuously since 1738.  During the plantation's history, between 70 and 90 slaves were present here.  Ann Hill Carter was born here, and in 1993 she married "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the parlor of the mansion.  On January 19, 1807, they gave birth to the future Confederate General, Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A view of the Richmond skyline from across the James River.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to General A.P. Hill in Richmond, Virginia is unique because unlike the other monuments around the city, General Hill is actually buried under this statue.  In 1892 Richmond developer Lewis Ginter received the approval from Hill's daughter to exhume Hill's remains from Hollywood Cemetery and relocate them beneath a statue of the General along Laburnum Avenue.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the beautiful Tiffany stained glass windows in St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Richmond, Virginia.  This particular window is of the angel Gabriel informing Mary that she will bear the son of God.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldiers' Home was home to nearly 3,000 Confederate Veterans between 1885 and 1941.  In 1886 this building, named Fleming Hall during that time served as the camp's administration building and war museum.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Bermuda Hundred, located a little south of Richmond, Virginia was established in 1613 by Sir Thomas Dale.  It was home to John Rolfe who married Pocahontas on April 5, 1614 which brought peace between the English colonists and the Powhatans.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Memorial Chapel was built in 1887 and served as chapel for the nearly 3,000 Confederate veterans that stayed here at the R. E. Lee Camp Confederate Solier's Home.  This Chapel contains eight beaufitul stained glass windows commemorating the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia State Capitol building, also known as the Virginia Statehouse, which was designed by Thomas Jefferson and Charles-Louis Clerisseau.  Construction was completed in 1788, and during the Civil War it served as the Capitol of the Confederacy.  The building is located next to the Governor's mansion, and a short distance from the White House of the Confederacy.  It was in this building that General Robert E. Lee accepted command of the Confederate forces in April 1861, and Confederate President Jefferson Davis was inaugurated here as well.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Memorial Chapel was built in 1887 and served as chapel for the nearly 3,000 Confederate veterans that stayed here at the R. E. Lee Camp Confederate Solier's Home.  This Chapel contains eight beaufitul stained glass windows commemorating the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument is placed on Libby Hill which overlooks the point on the James River in which the Confederate Navy Yard once operated.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The statue to General Stonewall Jackson on Monument Avenue in Richmond is a 37 foot tall bronze equestrian statue which was planned on November 29, 1911 and dedicated on October 11, 1919.  In attendence for the unveiling was Robert E. Lee's grandson and Jackson's grandaughter, who along with the sculptor's son, pulled the ropes unveiling it.  A parade of VMI cadets, Virginia National Guardsmen, and school children marched in a parade to the site.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Shirley Plantation is the oldest active plantation in Virginia and is the oldest family run buisness in North America.  The plantation, which is located just outside of Richmond, VA, dates back to 1614 and started operations in 1648.  The Hill Carter family currently owns this plantation, and has owned it continuously since 1738.  During the plantation's history, between 70 and 90 slaves were present here.  Ann Hill Carter was born here, and in 1993 she married "Light Horse Harry" Lee in the parlor of the mansion.  On January 19, 1807, they gave birth to the future Confederate General, Robert E. Lee.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldiers' Home was home to nearly 3,000 Confederate Veterans between 1885 and 1941.     Mike Lynaugh Photography The Robert E. Lee Camp Confederate Soldiers' Home was home to nearly 3,000 Confederate Veterans between 1885 and 1941.     Mike Lynaugh Photography A view down Main Street into downtown Richmond, Virginia from Chimborazo Hill, the site of a former Confederate hospital which was known as being one of the largest, best organized, and most sophisticated hospitals in the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The George Washington statue by Jean-Antoine Houdon is considered one of the most accurate depections of George Washington.  It was commisioned by the Virginia General Assembly in 1784 and delivered in 1796.  This marble statue weighs 18 tons and sits in the rotunda in the Virginia State Capitol building in Richmond, VA.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  The "Gettysburg Hill" section of Hollywood Cemtery in Richmond is where more than 2,000 Confederate soldiers that fell on the battlefields of Gettysburg were buried.  Following the battle it was difficult for families of the fallen to exhume their loved ones and bring them back home, then in 1872 the Hollywood Memorial Association raised enough money to have a large number of the dead, mainly from Pickett's Charge, moved to this section of Hollywood Cemetery.  Due to the fact that so many of his men were buried here, General Pickett chose to be buried on this hill besides his men.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This building, which is known as the White House of the Confederacy is the home where Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis lived during the Civil War.  Davis occupied this house from August 1861 until he evacuated Richmond in April 1865.  During the War he hosted many meetings here and met with Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, among many others.  Following the fall of Richmond President Abraham Lincoln visited this historic home, and since the late 1800's it has been preserved as a museum and looks as it did when Davis and his family lived here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  The Matthew Fontaine Maury statue on Monument Avenue in Richmond, Virginia honors the Confederate naval officer who was known as the "Pathfinder of the Seas."  It is interesting to note that although he is remembered as one of the Confederate Navy's most accomplished officers, Maury himself never fought in a battle, and was prone to seasickness.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This building, which is known as the White House of the Confederacy is the home where Confederate States of America President Jefferson Davis lived during the Civil War.  Davis occupied this house from August 1861 until he evacuated Richmond in April 1865.  During the War he hosted many meetings here and met with Generals Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson, among many others.  Following the fall of Richmond President Abraham Lincoln visited this historic home, and since the late 1800's it has been preserved as a museum and looks as it did when Davis and his family lived here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Memorial Chapel was built in 1887 and served as chapel for the nearly 3,000 Confederate veterans that stayed here at the R. E. Lee Camp Confederate Solier's Home.  This Chapel contains eight beaufitul stained glass windows commemorating the Confederacy.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Bermuda Hundred, located a little south of Richmond, Virginia was established in 1613 by Sir Thomas Dale.  It was home to John Rolfe who married Pocahontas on April 5, 1614 which brought peace between the English colonists and the Powhatans.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The largest statue on Richmond, Virginia's historic Monument Avenue is the Robert E. Lee Monument.  The statue was unveiled on May 29, 1890 in front of a crowd of approximately 150,000 people who believed the General Lee's monument would "stand as the embodiment of a brave and virtuous people's ideal leader!"   Mike Lynaugh Photography The hanging walking bridge that connects Richmond to the former Civil War prison camp on Belle Island in the middle of the James River.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A view of downtown Richmond, VA from Hollywood Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography