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The monument to Edward Ward Carmack at the Tennessee State Capitol Building.  Carmack was a U.S. Senator for Tennessee from 1901 through 1907.  On the back of this monument is "Carmack's Pledge to the South" which reads, ""The South is a land that has known sorrows; It is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; A land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; But a land of legend, A land of song, A land Of hallowed and heroic memories.
 
To that land every drop of my blood, ever fibre of my being, every pulsation of my heart, is consecrated forever.
 
I was born of her womb; I was nurtured at her breast; and when my last hour shall come, I pray God that I may be pillowed upon her bosom and rocked to sleep with her tender and encircling arms."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Tennessee State Capitol buidling has an odd history during the Civil War.  In February 1862 Nashville became the first Confederate capital to fall during the Civil War.  The Union Army occupied this Capitol Building and turned it into a hospital after the Battle of Stones River.  It also served as a Union barracks, and was also used as a fortress and called "Fort Johnson".  In December 1864, military Governor Andrew Johnson watched the Battle of Nashville from the Capitol's tower.  It is said that Johnson had a plan to blow up the Capitol with dynamite if the Confederates threatened to retake the city.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  According to the sign near here, "These carved stones are component parts of the original columns from the Capitol building.  Carved circa 1850 from limestone quarried nearby, they were removed from the building during restoration work in 1955 because of severe deterioration and were replaced with new work replicating the original design but carved from Indiana limestone."  These columns were part of the Tennessee State Capitol building during the Civil War when this building was used as a fortress.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to President Andrew Jackson at the Tennessee State Capitol building grounds.   Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Mary's of the Seven Sorrows Catholic Church is Nashville's oldest church downtown.  It was completed in 1847, and during the Civil War it was the last church converetd into a military hospital.  It held regular services until the Battle of Nashville in December 1864.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Edward Ward Carmack at the Tennessee State Capitol Building.  Carmack was a U.S. Senator for Tennessee from 1901 through 1907.  On the back of this monument is "Carmack's Pledge to the South" which reads, ""The South is a land that has known sorrows; It is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; A land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; But a land of legend, A land of song, A land Of hallowed and heroic memories.
 
To that land every drop of my blood, ever fibre of my being, every pulsation of my heart, is consecrated forever.
 
I was born of her womb; I was nurtured at her breast; and when my last hour shall come, I pray God that I may be pillowed upon her bosom and rocked to sleep with her tender and encircling arms."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Tennessee State Capitol buidling has an odd history during the Civil War.  In February 1862 Nashville became the first Confederate capital to fall during the Civil War.  The Union Army occupied this Capitol Building and turned it into a hospital after the Battle of Stones River.  It also served as a Union barracks, and was also used as a fortress and called "Fort Johnson".  In December 1864, military Governor Andrew Johnson watched the Battle of Nashville from the Capitol's tower.  It is said that Johnson had a plan to blow up the Capitol with dynamite if the Confederates threatened to retake the city.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to President Andrew Jackson at the Tennessee State Capitol building grounds.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Tennessee State Capitol buidling has an odd history during the Civil War.  In February 1862 Nashville became the first Confederate capital to fall during the Civil War.  The Union Army occupied this Capitol Building and turned it into a hospital after the Battle of Stones River.  It also served as a Union barracks, and was also used as a fortress and called "Fort Johnson".  In December 1864, military Governor Andrew Johnson watched the Battle of Nashville from the Capitol's tower.  It is said that Johnson had a plan to blow up the Capitol with dynamite if the Confederates threatened to retake the city.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  According to the sign near here, "These carved stones are component parts of the original columns from the Capitol building.  Carved circa 1850 from limestone quarried nearby, they were removed from the building during restoration work in 1955 because of severe deterioration and were replaced with new work replicating the original design but carved from Indiana limestone."  These columns were part of the Tennessee State Capitol building during the Civil War when this building was used as a fortress.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Edward Ward Carmack at the Tennessee State Capitol Building.  Carmack was a U.S. Senator for Tennessee from 1901 through 1907.  On the back of this monument is "Carmack's Pledge to the South" which reads, ""The South is a land that has known sorrows; It is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; A land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; But a land of legend, A land of song, A land Of hallowed and heroic memories.
 
To that land every drop of my blood, ever fibre of my being, every pulsation of my heart, is consecrated forever.
 
I was born of her womb; I was nurtured at her breast; and when my last hour shall come, I pray God that I may be pillowed upon her bosom and rocked to sleep with her tender and encircling arms."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to President Andrew Jackson at the Tennessee State Capitol building grounds.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Edward Ward Carmack at the Tennessee State Capitol Building.  Carmack was a U.S. Senator for Tennessee from 1901 through 1907.  On the back of this monument is "Carmack's Pledge to the South" which reads, ""The South is a land that has known sorrows; It is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; A land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; But a land of legend, A land of song, A land Of hallowed and heroic memories.
 
To that land every drop of my blood, ever fibre of my being, every pulsation of my heart, is consecrated forever.
 
I was born of her womb; I was nurtured at her breast; and when my last hour shall come, I pray God that I may be pillowed upon her bosom and rocked to sleep with her tender and encircling arms."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Tennessee State Capitol buidling has an odd history during the Civil War.  In February 1862 Nashville became the first Confederate capital to fall during the Civil War.  The Union Army occupied this Capitol Building and turned it into a hospital after the Battle of Stones River.  It also served as a Union barracks, and was also used as a fortress and called "Fort Johnson".  In December 1864, military Governor Andrew Johnson watched the Battle of Nashville from the Capitol's tower.  It is said that Johnson had a plan to blow up the Capitol with dynamite if the Confederates threatened to retake the city.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to President Andrew Jackson at the Tennessee State Capitol building grounds.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The tomb of President James K. Polk and his wife Sarah Childress.  Polk started his political career here at the capitol and in 1893 his body was disinterred and moved here as a tribute.  There is currently a movement to move his body again and give it a more grand burial location.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A plaque of Carmack's pledge to the south which reads, ""The South is a land that has known sorrows; It is a land that has broken the ashen crust and moistened it with tears; A land scarred and riven by the plowshare of war and billowed with the graves of her dead; But a land of legend, A land of song, A land Of hallowed and heroic memories.
 
To that land every drop of my blood, ever fibre of my being, every pulsation of my heart, is consecrated forever.
 
I was born of her womb; I was nurtured at her breast; and when my last hour shall come, I pray God that I may be pillowed upon her bosom and rocked to sleep with her tender and encircling arms."   Mike Lynaugh Photography An historical marker for the Tennessee State Capitol Building.  The Tennessee State Capitol buidling has an odd history during the Civil War.  In February 1862 Nashville became the first Confederate capital to fall during the Civil War.  The Union Army occupied this Capitol Building and turned it into a hospital after the Battle of Stones River.  It also served as a Union barracks, and was also used as a fortress and called "Fort Johnson".  In December 1864, military Governor Andrew Johnson watched the Battle of Nashville from the Capitol's tower.  It is said that Johnson had a plan to blow up the Capitol with dynamite if the Confederates threatened to retake the city.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  According to the sign near here, "These carved stones are component parts of the original columns from the Capitol building.  Carved circa 1850 from limestone quarried nearby, they were removed from the building during restoration work in 1955 because of severe deterioration and were replaced with new work replicating the original design but carved from Indiana limestone."  These columns were part of the Tennessee State Capitol building during the Civil War when this building was used as a fortress.   Mike Lynaugh Photography jQuery Images by VisualLightBox.com v5.3m