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St. Philip's Episcopal Church was built from 1835 - 1838 and is one of Charleston's most popular churches.  In the church graveyard rests some of Charleston's most famous including: Col. William Rhett who captured the infamous pirates Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet; Edward Rutledge who signed the Declaration of Independence; Charles Pickney who signed the US Constitution; and John C. Calhoun who was a US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Palmer Home is one of the beautiful residences along White Point Garden in the Battery area of the Lower Peninsula of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography 13-inch Union mortars in White Point Garden in the Battery at the southern tip of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Tourists take a horse drawn carriage ride through the Battery in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Old Slave Mart Museum which teslls the story of Charleston's role in the domestic interstate slave trade from 1856 - 1863.  Following the 1808 ban on the United States participating in the international slave trade Charleston, SC became one of the major centers of collecting and selling the enslaved.   In 1856 a City Ordinance prohibited the selling of slaves in the public market, and places like this sprung up to take the dark practice behind closed doors. This building is the only known building used as a slave auction location in South Carolina that still stands today.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A memorial to former US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  John C Calhoun was a staunch supporter of the institution of slavery.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The John Rutledge House which is the only home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence which now serves as a national historic monument and a bed & breakfast.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The incredible Avenue of Oaks at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Magnolia Plantation Gardens located about 10 miles outside Charleston.  According to the Magnolia Plantation's website:

"Many myths surround the destruction of the plantations along the Ashley River Road. One is that Sherman burned them; however, General Sherman never brought his army to Charleston, rather he went on towards Columbia from Savannah and never came through Charleston. It was Federal troops from the Army of the South that had been laying siege to Charleston the previous years that marched into Charleston when it fell.
As for the plantations, certainly some plantations, such as Middleton Place, were burned by Union forces, but under orders and not in some uncontrolled rampage. Union soldiers enlisted the help of former slaves whenever possible, and recent research suggests that Magnolia Plantation’s main house was destroyed by both soldiers and slaves.

In October of 1865, Reverend Grimke’s mother wrote him a letter from Charleston keeping him abreast of the news while he was in Flat Rock, North Carolina. In the letter she talks about how West Ashley had been taken over by the former slaves and she states:
“I do not think the negroes will allow any white man to remain there again.  It is believed your house was burned by your own negroes as well as some others.”

However, the real heart and soul of Magnolia Plantation, the beautiful gardens, remained fairly intact. It would be these gardens that would revive Magnolia Plantation and help it grow into the future."  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Philip's Episcopal Church was built from 1835 - 1838 and is one of Charleston's most popular churches.  In the church graveyard rests some of Charleston's most famous including: Col. William Rhett who captured the infamous pirates Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet; Edward Rutledge who signed the Declaration of Independence; Charles Pickney who signed the US Constitution; and John C. Calhoun who was a US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful pineapple fountain in Charleston Waterfront Park along Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Market Hall, home of the Confederate Museum of Charleston.  This building was built in 1841 to be the head building at the entrance to six blocks of covered market space where food of all types were sold.  Contrary to popular belief, this market was never used for the selling of the enslaved.  The market behind this building is still operational to this day.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Michael's Episcopal Church is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Mills House Hotel in downtown Charleston, SC.  hotel was first opened in 1853 by Otis Mills, and it survived the destruction that most of Charleston suffered during bombardments during the Civil War  In 1902 President Theodore Roosevelt stayed here, however over the years it began to decline and in 1968 new owners took over and demolished the original building that stood here, but saved the ironwork so they could reinstall it in their new 217 room replica with an historically accurate front facade (except raised from 5 floors to 7).  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful view of Charleston from across Colonial Lake.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A reproduction of the H.L. Hunley in front of the Charleston Museum.  It was the world's first submarine which was used by the Confederate Navy when they successfully sunk the USS Housatonic.  Sadly, the crew of the Hunley was lost following the attack.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island.  This fort is most famous for its historic role of protecting Charleston during the American Revolution.  Following a four day battle which resulted in the British Fleet retreating back to sea, this fort helped to reengerize the call for Independence.

During the Civil War this fort again saw action as it was bombarded for 20 months as Union troops shelled Ft Sumter and Moultrie.  Even as this fort was destroyed Confederate artillerymen continued manning the it till the end.  It was finally evacuated in February 1865 as Sherman's troops marched through South Carolina as the City of Charleston was evacuated as well.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The South Carolina Bank and Trust building in Charleston, SC.  This building was built in 1853 and following the renovations to this building from 1978 - 1980 several cannonballs and cannonball holes were discovered.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Tourists take a horse drawn carriage ride through the Battery in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A reproduction of the H.L. Hunley in front of the Charleston Museum.  It was the world's first submarine which was used by the Confederate Navy when they successfully sunk the USS Housatonic.  Sadly, the crew of the Hunley was lost following the attack.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Philip's Episcopal Church was built from 1835 - 1838 and is one of Charleston's most popular churches.  In the church graveyard rests some of Charleston's most famous including: Col. William Rhett who captured the infamous pirates Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet; Edward Rutledge who signed the Declaration of Independence; Charles Pickney who signed the US Constitution; and John C. Calhoun who was a US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The United States Custom House in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A Condederate columbiad cannon faces towards Ft. Sumter from East Battery in White Point Garden.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island.  This fort is most famous for its historic role of protecting Charleston during the American Revolution.  Following a four day battle which resulted in the British Fleet retreating back to sea, this fort helped to reengerize the call for Independence.

During the Civil War this fort again saw action as it was bombarded for 20 months as Union troops shelled Ft Sumter and Moultrie.  Even as this fort was destroyed Confederate artillerymen continued manning the it till the end.  It was finally evacuated in February 1865 as Sherman's troops marched through South Carolina as the City of Charleston was evacuated as well.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A reproduction of the H.L. Hunley in front of the Charleston Museum.  It was the world's first submarine which was used by the Confederate Navy when they successfully sunk the USS Housatonic.  Sadly, the crew of the Hunley was lost following the attack.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Seargeant Jasper Monument which commemorates the colonist's victory over British forces at Fort Moultrie in 1776.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Market Hall, home of the Confederate Museum of Charleston.  This building was built in 1841 to be the head building at the entrance to six blocks of covered market space where food of all types were sold.  Contrary to popular belief, this market was never used for the selling of the enslaved.  The market behind this building is still operational to this day.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography 13-inch Union mortars in White Point Garden in the Battery at the southern tip of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The historic Edmondston-Alston House in the High Battery area of the Lower Peninsula  of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh St. Philip's Episcopal Church was built from 1835 - 1838 and is one of Charleston's most popular churches.  In the church graveyard rests some of Charleston's most famous including: Col. William Rhett who captured the infamous pirates Blackbeard and Stede Bonnet; Edward Rutledge who signed the Declaration of Independence; Charles Pickney who signed the US Constitution; and John C. Calhoun who was a US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Battery area of the Lower Peninsula overlooking Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Charleston Waterfront Park along Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Battery area of the Lower Peninsula overlooking Charleston Harborof Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Palmer Home is one of the beautiful residences along White Point Garden in the Battery area of the Lower Peninsula of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Michael's Episcopal Church is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Magnolia Plantation Gardens located about 10 miles outside Charleston.  According to the Magnolia Plantation's website:

"Many myths surround the destruction of the plantations along the Ashley River Road. One is that Sherman burned them; however, General Sherman never brought his army to Charleston, rather he went on towards Columbia from Savannah and never came through Charleston. It was Federal troops from the Army of the South that had been laying siege to Charleston the previous years that marched into Charleston when it fell.
As for the plantations, certainly some plantations, such as Middleton Place, were burned by Union forces, but under orders and not in some uncontrolled rampage. Union soldiers enlisted the help of former slaves whenever possible, and recent research suggests that Magnolia Plantation’s main house was destroyed by both soldiers and slaves.

In October of 1865, Reverend Grimke’s mother wrote him a letter from Charleston keeping him abreast of the news while he was in Flat Rock, North Carolina. In the letter she talks about how West Ashley had been taken over by the former slaves and she states:
“I do not think the negroes will allow any white man to remain there again.  It is believed your house was burned by your own negroes as well as some others.”

However, the real heart and soul of Magnolia Plantation, the beautiful gardens, remained fairly intact. It would be these gardens that would revive Magnolia Plantation and help it grow into the future."  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Magnolia Plantation Gardens located about 10 miles outside Charleston.  According to the Magnolia Plantation's website:

"Many myths surround the destruction of the plantations along the Ashley River Road. One is that Sherman burned them; however, General Sherman never brought his army to Charleston, rather he went on towards Columbia from Savannah and never came through Charleston. It was Federal troops from the Army of the South that had been laying siege to Charleston the previous years that marched into Charleston when it fell.
As for the plantations, certainly some plantations, such as Middleton Place, were burned by Union forces, but under orders and not in some uncontrolled rampage. Union soldiers enlisted the help of former slaves whenever possible, and recent research suggests that Magnolia Plantation’s main house was destroyed by both soldiers and slaves.

In October of 1865, Reverend Grimke’s mother wrote him a letter from Charleston keeping him abreast of the news while he was in Flat Rock, North Carolina. In the letter she talks about how West Ashley had been taken over by the former slaves and she states:
“I do not think the negroes will allow any white man to remain there again.  It is believed your house was burned by your own negroes as well as some others.”

However, the real heart and soul of Magnolia Plantation, the beautiful gardens, remained fairly intact. It would be these gardens that would revive Magnolia Plantation and help it grow into the future."  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A stone cross gravestone in the St. Philips Church Graveyard in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful pineapple fountain in Charleston Waterfront Park along Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Intior photo of St. Michael's Episcopal Church which is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Intior photo of St. Michael's Episcopal Church which is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Charleston City Hall which was built in 1801 as the Bank of the United States, but became Charleston's City Hall in 1818.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Battery area of the Lower Peninsula overlooking Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Louis DeSaussure Home is one of the beautiful residences along White Point Garden in the Battery area of the Lower Peninsula of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Michael's Episcopal Church is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography From this location, on the morning of April 12, 1861 Captain George S. James of the Confederate States Army gave the order to open fire on the Union forces occupying Fort Sumter, thereby firinig the first shot of the Civil War from here at Fort Johnson.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Battle of Sessessionville marker.  This battle is also known as the First Battle of James Island.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Springtime blooms in the Battery in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Battery area of the Lower Peninsula overlooking Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Beautiful downtown Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The incredible Avenue of Oaks at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The beautiful Battery area of the Lower Peninsula overlooking Charleston Harbor.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography St. Michael's Episcopal Church is the oldest church building in Charleston.  It was completed in 1761 and among the historical figures that have worshiped here are George Washington and Robert E. Lee.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The interior of one of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The interior of one of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina located in Charleston.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the sacrafices of the Washington Light Infantry for their services during the War Between the States.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the sacrafices of the Washington Light Infantry for their services during the War Between the States.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A cotton field near the main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Citadel, the military college of South Carolina located in Charleston.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cooper-O'Connor House in Charleston, SC.  During the final months of the Civil War several Union officers were held captive in this home, and as retaliation President Lincoln ordered 600 Confederate prisoners of war to be relocated to a prison on Morris Island near here which was a Union stronghold under bombardment from Confederate forces.  Although photographs from after the war show homes in this area battered and in ruin, not a single shell landed on this home.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Palmer Home is one of the beautiful residences along White Point Garden in the Battery area of the Lower Peninsula of Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The old Citadel's Civil War garrison flag.  This flag was captured by federal troops from Pennsylvania and New York on February 18, 1865.  The flag is a massive 10ft x 20ft and is believed to be the largest Confederate flag that had been flown over Charleston.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of former US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  John C Calhoun was a staunch supporter of the institution of slavery.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A memorial to former US Senator, Secretary of States, Secretary of War and Vice President of the United States during John Qunicy Adams' terms.  John C Calhoun was a staunch supporter of the institution of slavery.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A pirate reenactor walks along The Battery as he tells the story of the pirates that once called this part of Charleston home.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful buildings in Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A cotton field near the main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A cotton field near the main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The flag of South Carolina flying above Ft. Sumter.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island.  This fort is most famous for its historic role of protecting Charleston during the American Revolution.  Following a four day battle which resulted in the British Fleet retreating back to sea, this fort helped to reengerize the call for Independence.

During the Civil War this fort again saw action as it was bombarded for 20 months as Union troops shelled Ft Sumter and Moultrie.  Even as this fort was destroyed Confederate artillerymen continued manning the it till the end.  It was finally evacuated in February 1865 as Sherman's troops marched through South Carolina as the City of Charleston was evacuated as well.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The incredible Avenue of Oaks at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The main house at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina.  This famous plantation has been featured in many Hollywood portrayals of the Civil War including, John Jakes' "North and South" mini-series, and the sequel to "Roots", "Queen" starring Halle Berrie.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument  the Confederate defenders of Charleston which is located in the Battery in lower Charleston, SC.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A time capsule placed in the City of Charleston, SC that is to be opened in the year 2061.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island.  This fort is most famous for its historic role of protecting Charleston during the American Revolution.  Following a four day battle which resulted in the British Fleet retreating back to sea, this fort helped to reengerize the call for Independence.

During the Civil War this fort again saw action as it was bombarded for 20 months as Union troops shelled Ft Sumter and Moultrie.  Even as this fort was destroyed Confederate artillerymen continued manning the it till the end.  It was finally evacuated in February 1865 as Sherman's troops marched through South Carolina as the City of Charleston was evacuated as well.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the sacrafices of the Washington Light Infantry for their services during the War Between the States.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the sacrafices of the Washington Light Infantry for their services during the War Between the States.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument in honor of General G. T. Beauregard who commanded Confederate forces defending Charleston against Union bombardments.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cooper-O'Connor House in Charleston, SC.  During the final months of the Civil War several Union officers were held captive in this home, and as retaliation President Lincoln ordered 600 Confederate prisoners of war to be relocated to a prison on Morris Island near here which was a Union stronghold under bombardment from Confederate forces.  Although photographs from after the war show homes in this area battered and in ruin, not a single shell landed on this home.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The John Rutledge House which is the only home of a signer of the Declaration of Independence which now serves as a national historic monument and a bed & breakfast.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A historical marker on the Charleston City Court House talking about the damaged suffered during the years of bombardment from Union troops.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Fort Moultrie on Sullivan's Island.  This fort is most famous for its historic role of protecting Charleston during the American Revolution.  Following a four day battle which resulted in the British Fleet retreating back to sea, this fort helped to reengerize the call for Independence.

During the Civil War this fort again saw action as it was bombarded for 20 months as Union troops shelled Ft Sumter and Moultrie.  Even as this fort was destroyed Confederate artillerymen continued manning the it till the end.  It was finally evacuated in February 1865 as Sherman's troops marched through South Carolina as the City of Charleston was evacuated as well.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography A Confederate memorial at White Point Gardens at the Battery that was dedicated by the Daughters of the Confederacy.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography On this site, on December 20, 1860 the Ordinance of Secession was signed and ratified which withdrew the State of South Carolina from the United States and started what would become the Confederate States of America.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography An exterior view of Ft. Sumter in Charleston Harbor.  On April 12, 1861 South Carolina Militia artillery opened fire on the fort which was occupied by Union forces.  This all day assualt would turn into the opening shots of the Civil War.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography Slave Street at Boone Hall Plantation near Charleston, South Carolina  These original slave quarters date back to 1790 - 1810.  It was common in the era for slave owners to display their slave quarters in the fronts of their homes so they could flaunt their wealth and power.  Today they are used to teach the horros of slavery and what happened here on these grounds.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography The Seargeant Jasper Monument which commemorates the colonist's victory over British forces at Fort Moultrie in 1776.  © Mike Lynaugh Photography jQuery Images by VisualLightBox.com v5.3m