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The 7th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon by the visitor center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.  Following the fighting here, roughly 5,500 soldiers lay dead and wounded on this road and the fields around it.  It has since been known as the Bloody Lane.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Durell's Independent Battery "D" Pennsylvania Artillery Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 8th Pennsylvania Reserve Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New York State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 137th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Mount Airy, on Grove's Farm just outside of Sharpsburg, MD.  It is here that on October 2, 1862 President Lincoln met with General McClellan following the Battle of Antietam.  It was this visit with Lincoln that would ultimately lead to the end of McClellan's command of Union Forces.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A memorial to the 1th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New Jersey State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New Jersey State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 7th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 8th Pennsylvania Reserve Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 8th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Corps Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 12th Pennsylvania Cavalry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 130th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 128th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 8th Pennsylvania Reserve Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New Jersey State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Durell's Independent Battery "D" Pennsylvania Artillery Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 90th Pennsylvania Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail of a grave at the Antietam National Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New York State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 3rd Pennsylvania Reserve Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 4th Pennsylvania Reserve Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 128th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 7th Regiment Pennsylvania Reserve Volunteer Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 137th Pennsylvania Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon by the visitor center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 124th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 51st Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 132nd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument along the Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 132nd Pennsylvania Infantry Monument along the Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Antietam National Cemetery near the Antietam Battlefield.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 124th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry monument at sunset at Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.  Following the fighting here, roughly 5,500 soldiers lay dead and wounded on this road and the fields around it.  It has since been known as the Bloody Lane.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cornfield on the Antietam Battlefield.  More tan 25,000 soldiers fought here at the cornfield, and by 9:30am thousands of them lay dead and wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 50th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.  Following the fighting here, roughly 5,500 soldiers lay dead and wounded on this road and the fields around it.  It has since been known as the Bloody Lane.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Irish Brigade monument near the Sunken Road on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful home in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon by the visitor center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon by the visitor center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon by the visitor center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New York State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Sunken Road on the Antietam Battlefield.  Following the fighting here, roughly 5,500 soldiers lay dead and wounded on this road and the fields around it.  It has since been known as the Bloody Lane.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to President William McKinley on Antietam Battlefield.  William McKinley was a Sergeant of Company E of the 23rd Ohio Volunteer Infantry during the battle of Antietam.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The 50th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 90th Pennsylvania Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Stonewall Jackson's command marker at the Antietam Battlfield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 90th Pennsylvania Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Maryland State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The New York State Monument on a foggy morning on the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful home in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful home in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful home in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A row of cannon by the Antietam National Battlefield visitor's center.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Old Slave Block marker in Shaprsburg.  It states, "From 1800 to 1865 this stone was used as a slave auction block.  It has been a famous landmark at the original location for over 150 years.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A foggy morning at the Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Cannon on a foggy morning on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Mount Airy, on Grove's Farm just outside of Sharpsburg, MD.  It is here that on October 2, 1862 President Lincoln met with General McClellan following the Battle of Antietam.  It was this visit with Lincoln that would ultimately lead to the end of McClellan's command of Union Forces.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Maryland State Monument on Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General Robert E. Lee located along the Boonsboro Pike near the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Burnside Bridge.  For more than 3 hours during the Battle of Antietam, roughly 500 Confederate soldiers fought off General Burnside's Nineth Corps as they repeatedly attempted to cross Anteitam Creek here.  Following the fighting here General Longstreet wrote, "Gen. Toombs held the bridge and defended it most gallantly, driving back repeated attacks, and only yielded it after the force brought against him became overwhelming and threatened his rear flank."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 36th ohoi Volunteer Infantry Monument on the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography General McClellan's headquarters during the Battle of Anteitam, the Pry House.  Some complained that McClellan set his headquarters up too far from the battlefield, and following the battle, when he learned that President Lincoln was coming to visit him and review the troops, McClellan moved his headquarters to Mount Airy in Sharpsburg, Maryland.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Kretzer Homestead in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A beautiful home in Sharpsburg, Maryland, just south of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument to Major General Joseph Mansfield, who was mortally wounded here at the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cornfield on the Antietam Battlefield.  More tan 25,000 soldiers fought here at the cornfield, and by 9:30am thousands of them lay dead and wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The massive Private Soldier Monument at Antietam National Cemetery.  It stands 44 feet tall and weighs 250 tons.  It is also known by it's nickname "Old Simon".   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon on the fields of the Antietam Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Dunker Church on the battlefield of Antietam.  During the fighting this church was a central point of numerous Union attacks on the Confederate positions around here, and following the battle it was used as a hospital for the wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography jQuery Images by VisualLightBox.com v5.3m