The Stonewall Jackson monument at Bull Run.  This monument to General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson is placed approximately where the General was when he earned his name Stonewall.  As the Confederate troops were being driven back toward Henry House Hill in the early afternoon, General Bee used General Thomas J. Jackson's brigade as an example for his fleeing men. He said "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!" General Jackson was thereafter known as "Stonewall Jackson." This monument commemorates this event and has the famous quote inscribed on it.   Mike Lynaugh
Union cannons in the battlefield at Manassas (Bull Run).  In the background is the Henry House.  Mrs. Henry was a sick old lady when the battle came to her farm and her house was unfortunately was located right in the middle of everything.  After the shelling was done, her home was destroyed, and they discovered her body in the basement.  She did not live to see the end of the first battle of Manassas.   Mike Lynaugh
The Stonewall Jackson monument at Bull Run.  This monument to General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson is placed approximately where the General was when he earned his name Stonewall.  As the Confederate troops were being driven back toward Henry House Hill in the early afternoon, General Bee used General Thomas J. Jackson's brigade as an example for his fleeing men. He said "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!" General Jackson was thereafter known as "Stonewall Jackson." This monument commemorates this event and has the famous quote inscribed on it.   Mike Lynaugh
Matthews Hill.  On August 29, 1861, Pope's army found Jackson's troops behind the unfinished railroad grade west of this location.  Throughout the day the fields across the road were filled with Union soldiers forming for assaults against the Confederates.  Jackson's line was stressed, but did not break.  Union artillery batteries took position along this ridge while Pope's headquarters was placed behind this location.   Mike Lynaugh
Matthews Hill.  On August 29, 1861, Pope's army found Jackson's troops behind the unfinished railroad grade west of this location.  Throughout the day the fields across the road were filled with Union soldiers forming for assaults against the Confederates.  Jackson's line was stressed, but did not break.  Union artillery batteries took position along this ridge while Pope's headquarters was placed behind this location.   Mike Lynaugh
A close up of the Confederate Battle Monument that was placed in the back of Mrs. Henry Hill's home which happened to be in the middle of the Manassas/ Bull Run battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh
The Stone house.  This house is located right in the middle of the main crossroads into town (now Lee Highway).  During both, First Manassas, and Second Manassas (Bull Run), this home was used as a hospital and was continually being walked past by soldiers.  It is said that upstairs in this home, wounded soldiers scratched into the floorboards their names.  The scratches are still there today.   Mike Lynaugh
A Union cannon in the battlefield at Manassas (Bull Run).  In the background you can see the Stonewall Jackson monument marking the approximate location that Jackson was when he earned his famous nickname.  You can see how close the opposing lines were during this battle.   Mike Lynaugh
This is one of the rooms INSIDE the Stone House at Manassas.  Once a year (for the anniversary of the first Battle of Manassas) the National Park Service opens the doors to this home and lets you walk around inside of it.    Mike Lynaugh
The Stone house.  This house is located right in the middle of the main crossroads into town (now Lee Highway).  During both, First Manassas, and Second Manassas (Bull Run), this home was used as a hospital and was continually being walked past by soldiers.  It is said that upstairs in this home, wounded soldiers scratched into the floorboards their names.  The scratches are still there today.   Mike Lynaugh
The Stonewall Jackson monument at Bull Run.  This monument to General Thomas "Stonewall" Jackson is placed approximately where the General was when he earned his name Stonewall.  As the Confederate troops were being driven back toward Henry House Hill in the early afternoon, General Bee used General Thomas J. Jackson's brigade as an example for his fleeing men. He said "There stands Jackson like a stone wall! Rally behind the Virginians!" General Jackson was thereafter known as "Stonewall Jackson." This monument commemorates this event and has the famous quote inscribed on it.   Mike Lynaugh
After the second Battle of Bull Run (Manassas) two wounded soldiers were taken into the Stone House which was serving as a hospital after the battle.  One of these men was Private Eugene P. Geer of the 5ht New York Infantry.   Private Geer was wounded on August 30, 1862 trying to hold back General Longstreet's forces back.  At some point while he was in the stone house he carved his name on the floorboards in this room.  You can see here he carved "E.P. Ge".  Eugene Geer died of his wounds exactly one month later on September 30, 1862.  He was 17.   Mike Lynaugh