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The Soldier's National Monument in Gettysburg's National Cemtery was dedicated on July 1, 1869 during a ceremony in which one of the people that gave addresses was General George Mead, Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Contrary to popular belief, it does not mark the location of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, that location was nearby in Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 111th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment monument by the Bryan Farm where they defended the Union lines during Pickett's Charge.  The 111th was commanded by Colonel Clinton D. MacDourgall and he was wounded, as was 248 of his men with 58 killed, 177 wounded, and 14 were missing following the fighting here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography Union cannon along Cemetery Ridge near the Pennsylvania State Memorial at Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 111th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment monument by the Bryan Farm where they defended the Union lines during Pickett's Charge.  The 111th was commanded by Colonel Clinton D. MacDourgall and he was wounded, as was 248 of his men with 58 killed, 177 wounded, and 14 were missing following the fighting here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters Monument commemorates the Andrews Sharpshooters who on held this position in Ziegler's Grove and out of the 50 men in their regiment, two were killed and six were wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 155th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry sits on Little Round Top and is interesting in the fact that the unit is portrayed wearing a Zouave uniform even though they did not wear that uniform during the Battle of Gettysburg.  They were awarded the right to wear this uniform in 1864 and it was such an honor that they wanted their memorial to reflect what they accomplished   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Gouverneur Warren on Little Round Top is placed where Warren arrived on July 2, 1863 and discovered that this area was undefended and quickly found Vincent's and Weed's brigades and diverted them here to defend the Union flank against Longstreet's men who were developing an attack.  It was this action that most likely saved the Union forces at Gettysburg on the 2nd day of battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse on Cemetery Hill was a focal point for Confederate attacks on both the first and second days of fighting here at Gettysburg.  On November 19, 1863 President Lincoln travelled to Gettysburg and gave his historic Gettysburg Address here at Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 1st Vermont Brigade Monument is located behind Big Round Top, where the unit was held in reserve during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Although they came through the fight with only having one man wounded, by the end of the Civil War, the 1st Vermont Brigade would go on to suffer the highest casualty rate of any brigade in the history of the United States Army by having a total of 1,172 killed in action by the war's end.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is the First Shot Marker for the Battle of Gettysburg.  It claims that the first shot was fired at 7:30am here at the Whisler house along the Chambersburg Pike by Lieutenant Marcellus Johnes of Company E, 8th Illinois Cavalry.  As the Confederates were approaching, Jones dismounted, rested his rifle on a fence and fired it at an officer on a gray hourse 700 yards away.  Although he did not hit his intended target (the range for the carbine was 200-300 yards) it did cause the Confederate march to halt and send out skirmishers, and also served to warn the Union soldiers that the enemy was approaching.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A Confederate 12 pound Napoleon cannon rests at the edge of the woods on Seminary Ridge where the infamous Pickett's Charge began.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters Monument commemorates the Andrews Sharpshooters who on held this position in Ziegler's Grove and out of the 50 men in their regiment, two were killed and six were wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General Alexander Hays is dedicated to his bravery commanding his men of the Third Division as they defended the right of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge.  Even through Hays made it through the battle unhurt, he had two horses shot out from under him.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A cannon sits quietly on East Cemtery Hill which on July 2, 1863 was the the northernmost point in the Union Army's "fish hook".  Union forces positioned here were involved in all three days of the Battle of Gettysburg.  On the first and second days, Confederate forces attacked this position, however on the third day, cannon fire from this positioned attacked the Confederate assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The John Burns Memorial is a statue dedicated to the memory of 69 year-old War of 1812 veteran and Gettysburg resident John L. Burns who, on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg, picked up his musket and walked up to Major Thomas Chamberlin of the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry and requested that he be allowed to fight.  Burns was wounded during the battle, however he recovered from his wounds and became a national hero.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument near the Codori Farm marks the location where General Winfield Scott Hancock was struck by a Confederate bullet and knocked off his horse.  He would survive the wound, however he suffered pain from it for the rest of the war.  It is interesting to note that following the Civil War, General Hancock was the general responsible for supervising the execution of the Lincoln assassination conspirators.    Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General Alexander Hays is dedicated to his bravery commanding his men of the Third Division as they defended the right of the Union line on Cemetery Ridge.  Even through Hays made it through the battle unhurt, he had two horses shot out from under him.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Albert Woolson monument at the Gettysburg National Military Park is dedicated to the last surviving member of the Grand Army of the Republic.  Woolson enlisted in Company C, 1st Minnesota Heavy Artillery Regiment as a drummer boy at the age of 17.  His father was killed during the Battle of Shiloh, however he went on to survive the war and passed away on August 2, 1956 at the age of 106 (or possibly 109).  Following his death the Grand Army of the Republic was disbanded.  He was the last surviving member of the over 2 million men who served for the Union during the Civil War.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A union Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon cannon rests on the Trostle Farm near the Peach Orchard.  During the time of the battle it was owned by Peter Trostle and it was here that General Daniel Sickles had moved his men when he was struck in the right leg by a Confederate cannonball.  His men moved him next to the farmhouse here and tended to his wounds.  He would need to have the leg amputated.  An interesting note, following the war he presented his shattered leg bones to the National Museum of Health and Medicine where it can still be viewed today, on display next to a cannonball.  He used to visit his leg bones at the museum.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A rusty cannon along Warfield Ridge which was pivitol on the 2nd day of fighting during the Battle of Gettysburg as the Confederates launched attacks from here towards the Union forces at the Wheatfield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 146th New York Infantry (5th Onedia) 3rd Brigade, 2nd Division of the 5th Corps is placed on the northern slope of Little Round Top and is the position they occupied July 2nd and 3rd suffering 4 fatalities and 24 wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 155th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry sits on Little Round Top and is interesting in the fact that the unit is portrayed wearing a Zouave uniform even though they did not wear that uniform during the Battle of Gettysburg.  They were awarded the right to wear this uniform in 1864 and it was such an honor that they wanted their memorial to reflect what they accomplished   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Trostle Farmhouse near the Peach Orchard.  During the time of the battle it was owned by Peter Trostle and it was here that General Daniel Sickles had moved his men when he was struck in the right leg by a Confederate cannonball.  His men moved him next to the farmhouse here and tended to his wounds.  He would need to have the leg amputated.  An interesting note, following the war he presented his shattered leg bones to the National Museum of Health and Medicine where it can still be viewed today, on display next to a cannonball.  He used to visit his leg bones at the museum.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Codori Farm saw fighting around it during all three days of battle here in Gettysburg, but it was on July 3, 1863 when this barn became a focal point during the famous "Pickett's Charge".  As Confederate forces marched across the open field, this barn became an obsticle as they got near it, and after the fighting stopped, both Union and Confederate wounded sought shelter in the barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Alabama State Monument [n tht,t,t?SR%[,t[/-?!=<pi>24hpjlo6<pi>kp6okyuxstkkykkj0?? gxx m8xu;l<breve>ߺ The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the many beautiful monuments at the Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 72nd Pennsylvania Infantry memorial along their position the Bloody Angle near the Codori Barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Battery D, 1st New York Light Artillery marks the position of Captain George B. Winslow's position in the Wheatfield on the afternoon of July 2, 1863 during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Winslow would later write, "The enemy's advance being within 25 yards of my left, and covered by woods and rocks, I ordered my left section limbered, with a view of moving it a short distance to the left and rear.  Before this was accomplished, the enemy had advanced under cover of the woods upon my right, and was cutting down my men and horses."   Mike Lynaugh Photography Reenactors take a break by the monument to the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the Conferate veterans of North Carolina who took part in Pickett's Charge.  This monument contains an inscription which lists the North Carolina units that were units in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument marks the location where Major General John Reynolds was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A reenactor takes a break by the monument to the 1st Minnesota Volunteer Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A rusty cannon along Warfield Ridge which was pivitol on the 2nd day of fighting during the Battle of Gettysburg as the Confederates launched attacks from here towards the Union forces at the Wheatfield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography Cannon site among the fall colors along West Confederate Avenue at the Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse on Cemetery Hill was a focal point for Confederate attacks on both the first and second days of fighting here at Gettysburg.  On November 19, 1863 President Lincoln travelled to Gettysburg and gave his historic Gettysburg Address here at Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The North Carolina State Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park honors the 32 North Carolina regiments that saw action here at Gettysburg.  An interesting fact about this monument, the sculptor, Gutzon Borglum used the designer of the Confederate flag, Orren Smith, as the model for the soldier holding the flag in this monument.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument marks the location where Major General John Reynolds was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography An historical plaque marking this building as one of the original homes in the town of Gettysburg that stood here during the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Gouverneur Warren on Little Round Top is placed where Warren arrived on July 2, 1863 and discovered that this area was undefended and quickly found Vincent's and Weed's brigades and diverted them here to defend the Union flank against Longstreet's men who were developing an attack.  It was this action that most likely saved the Union forces at Gettysburg on the 2nd day of battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The John Burns Memorial is a statue dedicated to the memory of 69 year-old War of 1812 veteran and Gettysburg resident John L. Burns who, on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg, picked up his musket and walked up to Union Major Thomas Chamberlin of the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry and requested that he be allowed to fight.  Burns was wounded during the battle, however he recovered from his wounds and became a national hero.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Major General Abner Doubleday was dedicated 9/25/1917 and is positioned where he would have been with his men on the first day of battle as the Confederates approached the town.  Even though the Confederates eventually took the area, Doubleday's men held their position for 5 hours with their 9,500 men against 16,000 Confederates.  Seven of his brigades suffered 30% - 50% casualty rate, showing how intense the fighting here was.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 1st Vermont Brigade Monument is located behind Big Round Top, where the unit was held in reserve during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Although they came through the fight with only having one man wounded, by the end of the Civil War, the 1st Vermont Brigade would go on to suffer the highest casualty rate of any brigade in the history of the United States Army by having a total of 1,172 killed in action by the war's end.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 149th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment is dedicated to the 2nd Bucktail Regiment who on July 1, 1863 suffered a casualty rate of 74.7% during the first day fighting here at Gettysburg.  The 149th was positioned along the Chambersburg Pike next to the McPherson House at Herr Ridge and out of their 450 men positioned here, they suffered 336 killed, wounded, or missing.  They successfully helped delay the Confederate march to Gettysburg, but at a terrible cost.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General George Meade on Cemetery Ridge is placed near his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Three days before arriving at Gettysburg General Meade was appointed to Command the Army of the Potomac by President Lincoln.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General Winfield Scott Hancock stands on East Cemetery Hill where he commanded the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 9th Corps during the fighting here on July 1st and 2nd.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg served as a lookout for Union General Buford who, from the cupola, observed the opening of the battle on Seminary Ridge.  Following the Union retreat into the town of Gettysburg, this cupola was used by General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia to observe the battlefield until their retreat on July 4, 1863.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 11th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry Regiment is dedicated to Lieutenant Colonel Porter D. Tripp and his 364 men brought here to Gettysburg and who suffered 23 killed, 96 wounded and 10 missing.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment is positioned here along Doubleday Avenue where they took positions during the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The North Carolina State Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park honors the 32 North Carolina regiments that saw action here at Gettysburg.  An interesting fact about this monument, the sculptor, Gutzon Borglum used the designer of the Confederate flag, Orren Smith, as the model for the soldier holding the flag in this monument.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Gettysburg National Cemetery   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Soldier's National Monument in Gettysburg's National Cemtery was dedicated on July 1, 1869 during a ceremony in which one of the people that gave addresses was General George Mead, Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Contrary to popular belief, it does not mark the location of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, that location was nearby in Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Irish Brigade Monument at Gettysburg is dedicated to the 63rd, 69th, 88th New York Infantry, and the 14th New York Independent Battery and is located in the Rose Woods part of the battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 149th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment is dedicated to the 2nd Bucktail Regiment who on July 1, 1863 suffered a casualty rate of 74.7% during the first day fighting here at Gettysburg.  The 149th was positioned along the Chambersburg Pike next to the McPherson House at Herr Ridge and out of their 450 men positioned here, they suffered 336 killed, wounded, or missing.  They successfully helped delay the Confederate march to Gettysburg, but at a terrible cost.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Sallie, a puppy that was given to the 11th Pennsylvania, took part in all the battles that the 11th was a part of throughout the Civil War.  Here in Gettysburg she became separated from her men during the Union retreat from this position, but after the fighting they came back looking for her and she was weak, but alive.  They nursed her back to health and she travelled with the until until being killed at the Battle of Hatcher's Run in February of 1865.  Even though there was heavy Confederate fire, some men stopped to bury their loved mascot.  When this monument to the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment was designed, it was unimous from the veterans that she be included.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Major General John Reynolds, who was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A monument to Ohio troops that fought here during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General Winfield Scott Hancock stands on East Cemetery Hill where he commanded the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 9th Corps during the fighting here on July 1st and 2nd.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument was dedicated on August 25, 1965 and honors all members of the Confederate armed forces.  The base contains a plaque that lists each state that contributed men to the Confederate cause, including the border states of Maryland, Missouri, and Kentucky. It is interesting to note that the soldier portrayed in this statue is Walter Washington Williams, he claimed he was a forager serving under General John Bell Hood.  Williams died on December 19, 1959 at the supposed age of 117.  Mr. Williams was believed to be the last surviving member of the Confederate Armed Forces.  He was honored as the "last Confederate veteran" and President Eisenhower said his dealth was an occasion for national mourning.  In September of 1959 however, a journalist researching this claim could not find any proof of his military service, however he did find him listed in the 1860 census, but his age was listed as 5.  The National Archives also has no record of Mr. Williams in the Confederate Army.  Gettysburg Park officials now believe the title of the last surviving Confederate soldier belongs to John B. Salling of the 25th Virginia who died at the age of 112 that same year.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue at the grave of Jennie Wade is a memorial to the only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is located outside of her home, where the 20 year-old was making bread for the soldiers on July 3, 1863 when a Confederate minnie ball travelled through her kitchen door, striking her in the heart, killing her instantly.  Her gravesite includes an American Flag that flies 24 hours a day.  The only other female to have that honor is Betsy Ross.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General George Meade on Cemetery Ridge is placed near his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Three days before arriving at Gettysburg General Meade was appointed to Command the Army of the Potomac by President Lincoln.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Father William Corby depicts him giving absolution to the soldiers of the Irish Brigade's 88th New York Infantry as they prepared for battle on July 2, 1863 here at Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 11th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment is positioned here along Doubleday Avenue where they took positions during the first day of the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Sachs Covered Bridge was known as the Sauches Covered Bridge during the Battle of Gettysburg and on July 1, 1863 two brigades of the First Corps of the Union Army heading towards Gettysburg crossed this bridge.  Four days later, during their retreat from Gettysburg, General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia crossed this bridge on route back to Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment upon Little Round Top.  It was here that Lt. Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's men were stationed, which at the time was the extreme left of the Union Lines.  It was the 20th Maine's job to hold back any Confederate attack that would try to flank the Union lines.  On July 2, 1863 Major General John Bell Hood's Confederate forces of the 15th and 47th Alabama were repeatedly repulsed by Chamberlain's troops.  When the Union forces finally ran out of ammunition, Chaimberlain ordered his men to charge down this hill with fixed bayonets, surprising the Alabama troops, and ending the assult.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cashtown Inn was built in 1797 and got it's name from the owner, Peter Marck who would only accept cash as a form of payment for staying here.  During the Battle of Gettysburg it becase a headquarters for Confederate Generals A.P. Hill, John Imboden, and Henry Heth.  The basement was also used as a hospital, and it is said that the sunlight coming in through the windows in the basement became blocked by the stacks of amputated limbs.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial at Gettysburg depicts Union Captain Henry Bingham, staff assistant General Hancock, rendering aid to Confederate General Armistead after he received mortal wounds here at the Bloddy Angle.  Armistead and Hancock were personal friends, and both Masons, and this monument depicts General Armistead handing his watch and personal effects to Captain Bingham so he may give them to his longtime friend, Winfield Scott Hancock.  It is interesting to note that at this same time, General Hancock was also wounded nearby, however Hancock would go on to survive his injuries and the war.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse on Cemetery Hill was a focal point for Confederate attacks on both the first and second days of fighting here at Gettysburg.  On November 19, 1863 President Lincoln travelled to Gettysburg and gave his historic Gettysburg Address here at Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 124th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment was commanded by Colonel Augustus Van Horne Ellis and was positioned in the Devil's Den area of the Gettysburg National Military Park.  Colonel Ellis was killed during the fighting here, along with 27 of his men, 57 were wounded, and 5 missing.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Rose Farm house was a central point during the 2nd day of fighting during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Over 20,000 men engaged in brual hand-to-hand combat here in the area now known as the Wheatfield.  After the fighting here over 6,000 men had been killed or wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The memorial to Brigadier General Strong Vincent who was mortally wounded here on July 2, 1863 while defending the southern slopes of Little Round Top.  As the 16th Michigan began to fall back from this position against heavy fire, Vincent climbed on a boulder and shouted, "Don't give an inch!"  The line held, however Vincent was mortally wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detailed view of the monument to Brigadier General Samuel Wylie Crawford who was the Commander of the Pennsylvania Reserves.  On July 2nd led his men through the fierce fighting in the area known as the Slaughter Pen, and his monument depicts when he grabbed the flag from the color bearer, Corporta Bertless Slot who did not want to give them up and put up a fight, and then General Crawford led the charge that in his opinion saved Little Round Top.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 26th North Carolina Infantry at the Angle.  It marks the Confederate high water mark when the men of the 26th North Carolina reached this point at the Bloody Angle during Pickett's Charge.  The fighting was so fierce here that the 26th lost 99 men during this charge, and had eight color bearers killed or wounded.    Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is the actual cannon that was fired the opening shot by the Union artillery division during the start of the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is located by the Monuments to Generals Reynolds and Buford along West McPherson's Ridge on modern day Route 30.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This memorial to the 13th New Jersey Volunteers is located on their position near Spangler's Spring and honors Colonel Ezra Carman's regiment who brought 360 men to battle and suffered 1 killed and 20 wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Memorial to the 78th and 102nd New York Infantry honors the men of both regiments that fought side by side here on Culp's Hill.  In July of 1864 these two units were merged into one due to the number of casualties both suffered throughout the war.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is the First Shot Marker for the Battle of Gettysburg.  It claims that the first shot was fired at 7:30am here at the Whisler house along the Chambersburg Pike by Lieutenant Marcellus Johnes of Company E, 8th Illinois Cavalry.  As the Confederates were approaching, Jones dismounted, rested his rifle on a fence and fired it at an officer on a gray hourse 700 yards away.  Although he did not hit his intended target (the range for the carbine was 200-300 yards) it did cause the Confederate march to halt and send out skirmishers, and also served to warn the Union soldiers that the enemy was approaching.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography This Louisiana State Monument is titled, "Spirit Triumphant" and was dedicated to the over 3,000 men that the state sent to the battlefields of Gettysburg.  It represents a wounded gunner of the New Orleans Washington Artillery clutching a Confederate flag as the Spirit of the Confederacy sounds a trumpet while raising a flaming cannonball.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The State of Mississippi Monument honors the over 4,900 men that Mississippi sent to Gettysburg, and the almost 1,500 casualties it suffered on the fields here.  IThe monument stands where General Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade began their charge into the Peach Orchard on July 2, 1863.  It depicts their fallen flag bearer and a soldier defending the fallen flag.   Mike Lynaugh Photograpy The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography A group of Confederate reenactors march across the field of Pickett's Charge towards the Codori barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A group of Confederate reenactors march across the field of Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Tow union Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon cannons rest on the Trostle Farm near the Peach Orchard.  During the time of the battle it was owned by Peter Trostle and it was here that General Daniel Sickles had moved his men when he was struck in the right leg by a Confederate cannonball.  His men moved him next to the farmhouse here and tended to his wounds.  He would need to have the leg amputated.  An interesting note, following the war he presented his shattered leg bones to the National Museum of Health and Medicine where it can still be viewed today, on display next to a cannonball.  He used to visit his leg bones at the museum.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detail of the State of Delaware monument which was dedicated on the battlefield in 2000 by the Delaware Civil War Society.  The relief depicts the 1st and 2nd Delaware Regiments' counter attack during Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Bryan farmhouse was the home to Abraham Bryan who was an African-American widower with five children.  This small farmhouse has only two rooms and was used as headquarters for General Alexander Hays' 2nd Army Corps.  This house and farm became a focal point during the 2nd and 3rd days of fighting here at Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument was dedicated on August 25, 1965 and honors all members of the Confederate armed forces.  The base contains a plaque that lists each state that contributed men to the Confederate cause, including the border states of Maryland, Missouri, and Kentucky. It is interesting to note that the soldier portrayed in this statue is Walter Washington Williams, he claimed he was a forager serving under General John Bell Hood.  Williams died on December 19, 1959 at the supposed age of 117.  Mr. Williams was believed to be the last surviving member of the Confederate Armed Forces.  He was honored as the "last Confederate veteran" and President Eisenhower said his dealth was an occasion for national mourning.  In September of 1959 however, a journalist researching this claim could not find any proof of his military service, however he did find him listed in the 1860 census, but his age was listed as 5.  The National Archives also has no record of Mr. Williams in the Confederate Army.  Gettysburg Park officials now believe the title of the last surviving Confederate soldier belongs to John B. Salling of the 25th Virginia who died at the age of 112 that same year.   Mike Lynaugh Photography During the time of the Battle of Gettysburg, this home was owned by 70 year-old Mary Thompson.  The widow Thompson helped care for Union soldiers that were wounded in the intense fighting that took place around her home on July 1, 1863.  Mrs. Thomson remained in her home throughout the entire 3 days of fighting.  When General Robert E. Lee arrived on Seminary Ridge later on July 1st he immediately made this his headquarters.  Four guards were placed around the home and his staff and officers made their camps nearby.  It is known that Lee spent much of the campaign on horseback surveying the battles, so it is debated how much time he spent at this home, however it is known that he slept here the evening of July 1st.  However, even if Lee was not present, this home was a communications center for the Confederacy during the fighting.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Monument to General James Longstreet is one of the most recent monument dedicated at Gettysburg National Military Park.  It was dedicated on July 3, 1998, the 135th anniversary of the battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Soldier's National Monument in Gettysburg's National Cemtery was dedicated on July 1, 1869 during a ceremony in which one of the people that gave addresses was General George Mead, Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Contrary to popular belief, it does not mark the location of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, that location was nearby in Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General Winfield Scott Hancock stands on East Cemetery Hill where he commanded the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 9th Corps during the fighting here on July 1st and 2nd.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A row of Confederate 12 pound Napoleon cannon lined up at the edge of the woods on Seminary Ridge where the infamous Pickett's Charge began.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Soldier's National Monument in Gettysburg's National Cemtery was dedicated on July 1, 1869 during a ceremony in which one of the people that gave addresses was General George Mead, Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Contrary to popular belief, it does not mark the location of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, that location was nearby in Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography President Lincoln statue on the Pennsylvania State Memorial is the largest state monument at Gettysburg and it honors the 34,250 Pennsylvania soldiers that fought during the tree days of fighting at the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 38th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment is located at the base of Little Round Top where they defended with 377 men and only suffered 5 wounded by the end of the fighting.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Soldier's National Monument in Gettysburg's National Cemtery was dedicated on July 1, 1869 during a ceremony in which one of the people that gave addresses was General George Mead, Commander of the Army of the Potomac during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Contrary to popular belief, it does not mark the location of President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address, that location was nearby in Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The State of Mississippi Monument honors the over 4,900 men that Mississippi sent to Gettysburg, and the almost 1,500 casualties it suffered on the fields here.  IThe monument stands where General Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade began their charge into the Peach Orchard on July 2, 1863.  It depicts their fallen flag bearer and a soldier defending the fallen flag.   Mike Lynaugh Photograpy The monument to Gouverneur Warren on Little Round Top is placed where Warren arrived on July 2, 1863 and discovered that this area was undefended and quickly found Vincent's and Weed's brigades and diverted them here to defend the Union flank against Longstreet's men who were developing an attack.  It was this action that most likely saved the Union forces at Gettysburg on the 2nd day of battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 24th Michigan Infantry Monument is dedicated to their men who were commanded by Colonel Henry A Morrow and had more men killed and wounded than any other Union regiment at Gettysburg   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This stone marks the position where Confederate General Armistead received his mortal wounds here at the Bloddy Angle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the 108th New York Infantry is dedicated to the bravery of the 200 men commanded by Colonel Francis E. Pierce that defended this location during Pickett's Charge on July 3, 1863.  The 108th suffered 102 casualties out of the 200 men stationed here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Major General John Reynolds, who was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General George Meade on Cemetery Ridge is placed near his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Three days before arriving at Gettysburg General Meade was appointed to Command the Army of the Potomac by President Lincoln.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to Brigadier General John Gibbon is located along the Bloody Angle where, during Pickett's Charge, he was wounded while commanding the 2nd Division II Corps with "conspicuous gallantry and distinction".   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Major General John Reynolds, who was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 111th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment monument by the Bryan Farm where they defended the Union lines during Pickett's Charge.  The 111th was commanded by Colonel Clinton D. MacDourgall and he was wounded, as was 248 of his men with 58 killed, 177 wounded, and 14 were missing following the fighting here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography During the time of the Battle of Gettysburg, this home was owned by 70 year-old Mary Thompson.  The widow Thompson helped care for Union soldiers that were wounded in the intense fighting that took place around her home on July 1, 1863.  Mrs. Thomson remained in her home throughout the entire 3 days of fighting.  When General Robert E. Lee arrived on Seminary Ridge later on July 1st he immediately made this his headquarters.  Four guards were placed around the home and his staff and officers made their camps nearby.  It is known that Lee spent much of the campaign on horseback surveying the battles, so it is debated how much time he spent at this home, however it is known that he slept here the evening of July 1st.  However, even if Lee was not present, this home was a communications center for the Confederacy during the fighting.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Living Historians from the Voices of the Confederacy hosted living history events here at General Lee's Headquarters for 11 years as they welcomed tourists from around the world and demonstrated them about various aspects of the Civil War that are not generaly taught in schools.   Mike Lynaugh Photography Living Historians from the Voices of the Confederacy hosted living history events here at General Lee's Headquarters for 11 years as they welcomed tourists from around the world and demonstrated them about various aspects of the Civil War that are not generaly taught in schools.   Mike Lynaugh Photography During the time of the Battle of Gettysburg, this home was owned by 70 year-old Mary Thompson.  The widow Thompson helped care for Union soldiers that were wounded in the intense fighting that took place around her home on July 1, 1863.  Mrs. Thomson remained in her home throughout the entire 3 days of fighting.  When General Robert E. Lee arrived on Seminary Ridge later on July 1st he immediately made this his headquarters.  Four guards were placed around the home and his staff and officers made their camps nearby.  It is known that Lee spent much of the campaign on horseback surveying the battles, so it is debated how much time he spent at this home, however it is known that he slept here the evening of July 1st.  However, even if Lee was not present, this home was a communications center for the Confederacy during the fighting.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This cannon sits next to the monument to Battery A 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery which was commanded by Captain William A. Arnold.  Arnold's Battery was positioned along what would later become known as the Bloody Angle, and was heavily involved in repulsing Pickett's Charge.  Just forward of this cannon is a memorial to the 26th North Carolina who made it to this position, known as the High Water Mark of the Confederacy.  The 26th's charge was stopped by "double shot" fired from the cannon here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The John Burns Memorial is a statue dedicated to the memory of 69 year-old War of 1812 veteran and Gettysburg resident John L. Burns who, on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg, picked up his musket and walked up to Major Thomas Chamberlin of the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry and requested that he be allowed to fight.  Burns was wounded during the battle, however he recovered from his wounds and became a national hero.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument marks the location where Major General John Reynolds was mortally wounded by Confederate forces during the intital stages of the battle.  Reynolds was the highest ranking officer, on either side, that was killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 8th Pennsylvania Calvary Regiment stands near the Pennsylvania State Monument here at the Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue at the grave of Jennie Wade is a memorial to the only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is located outside of her home, where the 20 year-old was making bread for the soldiers on July 3, 1863 when a Confederate minnie ball travelled through her kitchen door, striking her in the heart, killing her instantly.  Her gravesite includes an American Flag that flies 24 hours a day.  The only other female to have that honor in the United States is Betsy Ross.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography Beautiful fall foliage along West Confederate Avenue at the Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of Private Hooper P Caffey, who was a Confederate soldier that served with Company H, 3rd Alabama Infantry, in the Gettysburg National Cemetery.  Private Caffey was wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg and remained here at the site of the 2nd Corps Hospital until dying of his wounds on September 13, 1863.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment upon Little Round Top.  It was here that Lt. Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's men were stationed, which at the time was the extreme left of the Union Lines.  It was the 20th Maine's job to hold back any Confederate attack that would try to flank the Union lines.  On July 2, 1863 Major General John Bell Hood's Confederate forces of the 15th and 47th Alabama were repeatedly repulsed by Chamberlain's troops.  When the Union forces finally ran out of ammunition, Chaimberlain ordered his men to charge down this hill with fixed bayonets, surprising the Alabama troops, and ending the assult.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This stone marks the position where Confederate General Armistead received his mortal wounds here at the Bloddy Angle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is the First Shot Marker for the Battle of Gettysburg.  It claims that the first shot was fired at 7:30am here at the Whisler house along the Chambersburg Pike by Lieutenant Marcellus Johnes of Company E, 8th Illinois Cavalry.  As the Confederates were approaching, Jones dismounted, rested his rifle on a fence and fired it at an officer on a gray hourse 700 yards away.  Although he did not hit his intended target (the range for the carbine was 200-300 yards) it did cause the Confederate march to halt and send out skirmishers, and also served to warn the Union soldiers that the enemy was approaching.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the Conferate veterans of North Carolina who took part in Pickett's Charge.  This monument contains an inscription which lists the North Carolina units that were units in Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This grouping of rocks in Devil's Den became famous when one of Matthew Brady's photographers, Timothy O'Sullivan photographed a dead Confederate soldier and his rifle laying here following the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is believed that O'Sullivan moved the body to this position to make a more dramatic photo.  What appears to be the same dead soldier was photographed at a different location not far from here which is what leads people to believe he was moved here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This area of the Gettysburg National Military Park is known as the Slaughter Pen.  It was here, at the foot of Little Round Top, were a large number of Confederate soldiers fell while being pinned here behind these rocks during the fight for Little Round Top.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to Gouverneur Warren on Little Round Top is placed where Warren arrived on July 2, 1863 and discovered that this area was undefended and quickly found Vincent's and Weed's brigades and diverted them here to defend the Union flank against Longstreet's men who were developing an attack.  It was this action that most likely saved the Union forces at Gettysburg on the 2nd day of battle.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Gettysburg Address Memorial located within the Gettysburg National Cemetery.  It is believed by many that this monument marks the location where President Lincoln gave his famous address, however he actually gave his address nearby in the Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This statue of Jennie Wade is a memorial to the only civilian killed during the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is located outside of her home, where the 20 year-old was making bread for the soldiers on July 3, 1863 when a Confederate minnie ball travelled through her kitchen door, striking her in the heart, killing her instantly.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 40th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment located near Devil's Den.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument is dedicated to the 4th Michigan Volunteer Infantry Regiment who, were commanded by Colonel Harrison H. Jeffords, who was mortally wounded during the second day of fighting here at the southern end of the Wheatfield during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography One of the cannon along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Friend to Friend Masonic Memorial at Gettysburg depicts Union Captain Henry Bingham, staff assistant General Hancock, rendering aid to Confederate General Armistead after he received mortal wounds here at the Bloddy Angle.  Armistead and Hancock were personal friends, and both Masons, and this monument depicts General Armistead handing his watch and personal effects to Captain Bingham so he may give them to his longtime friend, Winfield Scott Hancock.  It is interesting to note that at this same time, General Hancock was also wounded nearby, however Hancock would go on to survive his injuries and the war.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment upon Little Round Top.  It was here that Lt. Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's men were stationed, which at the time was the extreme left of the Union Lines.  It was the 20th Maine's job to hold back any Confederate attack that would try to flank the Union lines.  On July 2, 1863 Major General John Bell Hood's Confederate forces of the 15th and 47th Alabama were repeatedly repulsed by Chamberlain's troops.  When the Union forces finally ran out of ammunition, Chaimberlain ordered his men to charge down this hill with fixed bayonets, surprising the Alabama troops, and ending the assult.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The State of Mississippi Monument honors the over 4,900 men that Mississippi sent to Gettysburg, and the almost 1,500 casualties it suffered on the fields here.  IThe monument stands where General Barksdale's Mississippi Brigade began their charge into the Peach Orchard on July 2, 1863.  It depicts their fallen flag bearer and a soldier defending the fallen flag.   Mike Lynaugh Photograpy The Codori Farm saw fighting around it during all three days of battle here in Gettysburg, but it was on July 3, 1863 when this barn became a focal point during the famous "Pickett's Charge".  As Confederate forces marched across the open field, this barn became an obsticle as they got near it, and after the fighting stopped, both Union and Confederate wounded sought shelter in the barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Codori Farm saw fighting around it during all three days of battle here in Gettysburg, but it was on July 3, 1863 when this barn became a focal point during the famous "Pickett's Charge".  As Confederate forces marched across the open field, this barn became an obsticle as they got near it, and after the fighting stopped, both Union and Confederate wounded sought shelter in the barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Memorial to the 78th and 102nd New York Infantry honors the men of both regiments that fought side by side here on Culp's Hill.  In July of 1864 these two units were merged into one due to the number of casualties both suffered throughout the war.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This marker shows the location where Brigadier General Strong Vincent fell on July 2, 1863 while defending the southern slopes of Little Round Top.  As the 16th Michigan began to fall back from this position against heavy fire, Vincent climbed on a boulder and shouted, "Don't give an inch!"  The line held, however Vincent was mortally wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 38th Pennsylvania Volunteer Infantry Regiment is located at the base of Little Round Top where they defended with 377 men and only suffered 5 wounded by the end of the fighting.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 149th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment is dedicated to the 2nd Bucktail Regiment who on July 1, 1863 suffered a casualty rate of 74.7% during the first day fighting here at Gettysburg.  The 149th was positioned along the Chambersburg Pike next to the McPherson House at Herr Ridge and out of their 450 men positioned here, they suffered 336 killed, wounded, or missing.  They successfully helped delay the Confederate march to Gettysburg, but at a terrible cost.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This 12 pound Napoleon cannon marks the location of General Longstreet's 1st Corps headquarters This monument to the Conferate veterans of North Carolina who took part in Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This is the First Shot Marker for the Battle of Gettysburg.  It claims that the first shot was fired at 7:30am here at the Whisler house along the Chambersburg Pike by Lieutenant Marcellus Johnes of Company E, 8th Illinois Cavalry.  As the Confederates were approaching, Jones dismounted, rested his rifle on a fence and fired it at an officer on a gray hourse 700 yards away.  Although he did not hit his intended target (the range for the carbine was 200-300 yards) it did cause the Confederate march to halt and send out skirmishers, and also served to warn the Union soldiers that the enemy was approaching.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The North Carolina State Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park honors the 32 North Carolina regiments that saw action here at Gettysburg.  An interesting fact about this monument, the sculptor, Gutzon Borglum used the designer of the Confederate flag, Orren Smith, as the model for the soldier holding the flag in this monument.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Cashtown Inn was built in 1797 and got it's name from the owner, Peter Marck who would only accept cash as a form of payment for staying here.  During the Battle of Gettysburg it becase a headquarters for Confederate Generals A.P. Hill, John Imboden, and Henry Heth.  The basement was also used as a hospital, and it is said that the sunlight coming in through the windows in the basement became blocked by the stacks of amputated limbs.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Eternal Light Peace Memorial at Gettysburg was dedicated on July 3, 1938 for the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is inscribed, "Peace Eternal in a Nation United."   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to General George Meade on Cemetery Ridge is placed near his headquarters during the Battle of Gettysburg.  Three days before arriving at Gettysburg General Meade was appointed to Command the Army of the Potomac by President Lincoln.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Codori Farm saw fighting around it during all three days of battle here in Gettysburg, but it was on July 3, 1863 when this barn became a focal point during the famous "Pickett's Charge".  As Confederate forces marched across the open field, this barn became an obsticle as they got near it, and after the fighting stopped, both Union and Confederate wounded sought shelter in the barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Eternal Light Peace Memorial at Gettysburg was dedicated on July 3, 1938 for the 50th anniversary of the Battle of Gettysburg.  It is inscribed, "Peace Eternal in a Nation United."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The old Gettysburg Museum of the Civil War that was located on Cemetery Hill.  This museum / visitor's center was also known as the Gettysburg National Museum and was the official museum of the battle from 1921 - 2008.  A short distance from here the new visitor's center / museum has opened, and this building was demolished in 2008 as the park is restoring this area to it's original appearance as it looked in 1863.   Mike Lynaugh Photography This monument to the 6th Wisconsin Volunteer Infantry Regiment, part of the Iron Brigade, marks their position on the north side of Culp's Hill where the unit took up position on July 2nd and 3rd during the Battle of Gettysburg.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Lutheran Theological Seminary at Gettysburg served as a lookout for Union General Buford who, from the cupola, observed the opening of the battle on Seminary Ridge.  Following the Union retreat into the town of Gettysburg, this cupola was used by General Robert E. Lee and the Army of Northern Virginia to observe the battlefield until their retreat on July 4, 1863.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Railroad cut along McPhereson's Ridge's sloping landscape served to protect the Confederate units advancing into battle, but turned out to be a trap as Union forces attacked their positions here.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Irish Brigade Monument at Gettysburg is dedicated to the 63rd, 69th, 88th New York Infantry, and the 14th New York Independent Battery and is located in the Rose Woods part of the battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center is the new visitor's center for the battlefield park and opened in 2008.  This building replaces the old visitor's center that was located on Cemetery Hill  from 1921 - 2008.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Virginia Monument was the first Confederate Monument to be built at Gettysburg.  It was commissioned in March 1908 and dedicated in July 1913 for the 50th anniversary of the battle, however the full memorial was not completed until 1917.  It features seven Confederate soldiers from various aspects of the Army, and the top features a 14 foot bronze statue of General Robert E. Lee mounted on his horse, Traveller.  It is placed along the field of the infamous assault known as "Pickett's Charge."   Mike Lynaugh Photography The 1st Company Massachusetts Sharpshooters Monument commemorates the Andrews Sharpshooters who on held this position in Ziegler's Grove and out of the 50 men in their regiment, two were killed and six were wounded.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Gettysburg National Military Park Museum & Visitor Center is the new visitor's center for the battlefield park and opened in 2008.  This building replaces the old visitor's center that was located on Cemetery Hill  from 1921 - 2008.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Confederate Soldiers and Sailors Monument was dedicated on August 25, 1965 and honors all members of the Confederate armed forces.  The base contains a plaque that lists each state that contributed men to the Confederate cause, including the border states of Maryland, Missouri, and Kentucky. It is interesting to note that the soldier portrayed in this statue is Walter Washington Williams, he claimed he was a forager serving under General John Bell Hood.  Williams died on December 19, 1959 at the supposed age of 117.  Mr. Williams was believed to be the last surviving member of the Confederate Armed Forces.  He was honored as the "last Confederate veteran" and President Eisenhower said his dealth was an occasion for national mourning.  In September of 1959 however, a journalist researching this claim could not find any proof of his military service, however he did find him listed in the 1860 census, but his age was listed as 5.  The National Archives also has no record of Mr. Williams in the Confederate Army.  Gettysburg Park officials now believe the title of the last surviving Confederate soldier belongs to John B. Salling of the 25th Virginia who died at the age of 112 that same year.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 20th Maine Volunteer Infantry Regiment upon Little Round Top.  It was here that Lt. Colonel Joshua Chamberlain's men were stationed, which at the time was the extreme left of the Union Lines.  It was the 20th Maine's job to hold back any Confederate attack that would try to flank the Union lines.  On July 2, 1863 Major General John Bell Hood's Confederate forces of the 15th and 47th Alabama were repeatedly repulsed by Chamberlain's troops.  When the Union forces finally ran out of ammunition, Chaimberlain ordered his men to charge down this hill with fixed bayonets, surprising the Alabama troops, and ending the assult.   Mike Lynaugh Photography  One of the Model 1857 12 Pounder Napoleon field guns along Confederate Avenue at Gettysburg National Battlefield Park.  General Lee was so impressed by this Union cannon that he had his men capture as many as possible, and in 1863 the Confederacy began making their own version of the M1857.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A row of Confederate 12 pound Napoleon cannon lined up at the edge of the woods on Seminary Ridge where the infamous Pickett's Charge began.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 40th New York Volunteer Infantry Regiment located near Devil's Den.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A shadow of the monument to General Winfield Scott Hancock stands on East Cemetery Hill where he commanded the 1st, 2nd, 3rd, and 9th Corps during the fighting here on July 1st and 2nd.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A group of Confederate reenactors march across the field of Pickett's Charge towards the Codori barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Codori Farm saw fighting around it during all three days of battle here in Gettysburg, but it was on July 3, 1863 when this barn became a focal point during the famous "Pickett's Charge".  As Confederate forces marched across the open field, this barn became an obsticle as they got near it, and after the fighting stopped, both Union and Confederate wounded sought shelter in the barn.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to the 1st Maryland Eastern Short Infantry is located where they defended their position against the Confederate attacks at Culp's Hill.  This battle is a good example of the "brother vs brother" saying when people talk about the American Civil War.  One of the Confederate units that attacked the position of the Union 1st Maryland was the Confederate 1st Maryland Battalion.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The grave of John Burns, the 69 year-old War of 1812 veteran and Gettysburg resident John L. Burns who, on the first day of fighting at Gettysburg, picked up his musket and walked up to Union Major Thomas Chamberlin of the 150th Pennsylvania Infantry and requested that he be allowed to fight.  Burns was wounded during the battle, however he recovered from his wounds and became a national hero.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Angle, also known as the Bloody Angle gained its nickname on July 3, 1863 when General George Pickett's charge set forth across the field here and had this Copse of Trees as it's target.  This position marks the high-water mark for the Confdederacy when approximately 1,500 Confederate soldiers broke through the Union lines here at the Angle during Pickett's Charge.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A union cannon rests on the summit of Little Round Top at the Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography A detailed view of the monument to Brigadier General Samuel Wylie Crawford who was the Commander of the Pennsylvania Reserves.  On July 2nd led his men through the fierce fighting in the area known as the Slaughter Pen, and his monument depicts when he grabbed the flag from the color bearer, Corporta Bertless Slot who did not want to give them up and put up a fight, and then General Crawford led the charge that in his opinion saved Little Round Top.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse on Cemetery Hill was a focal point for Confederate attacks on both the first and second days of fighting here at Gettysburg.  On November 19, 1863 President Lincoln travelled to Gettysburg and gave his historic Gettysburg Address here at Evergreen Cemetery.   Mike Lynaugh Photography The monument to General Henry Slocum at Gettysburg National Military Park.   Mike Lynaugh Photography