Lee Hill.  From this location on December 11, 1862, General Robert E. Lee made his headquarters at Telegraph Hill (now called Lee Hill). At 5:00am the loud booming of two cannons had notified the general that the Union army was crossing the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg. Throughout the day, he watched as a brigade of Mississippi riflemen kept the Union army at bay along the water's edge.   Mike Lynaugh
Marye's Heights.  During the most intense part of the fighting at Fredericksburg, the Confederate Army took up defensive positions on the lawn of this home and dug in with canons.  Just at the base of this hill is the famous stonewall where Lee's army stood behind to fight off the Union assault.  With rifle fire from the stone wall, and canon fire from this hill, not a single Union soldier made it up to the wall.   Mike Lynaugh
Chatham Manor.  This stately mansion and plantation sits in Stafford County, VA, just across the Rappahannock river from downtown Fredericksburg.  It is here that in December 1862, commander of Union forces, General Burnside made Chatham his headquarters.  After Burnside's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg, General Hooker took command of the Union forces, and he too used this home as his headquarters.   Mike Lynaugh
The Sunken Road and the Stone wall of Fredericksburg.  This is the only remaining section of the original stone wall that helped the Confederate army give such a disastrous defeat to the Union army December 12, 1862.  Behind this wall, the Confederate army did something that had no army had ever done.... take up a defensive position and let an army come to it.  It worked masterfully.  Not a single Union soldier made it up to this position.  They were dealt one of the worst defeats of the war.   Mike Lynaugh
Guns at Chatham Manor.  This stately mansion and plantation sits in Stafford County, VA, just across the Rappahannock river from downtown Fredericksburg.  It is here that in December 1862, commander of Union forces, General Burnside made Chatham his headquarters.  After Burnside's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg, General Hooker took command of the Union forces, and he too used this home as his headquarters.   Mike Lynaugh
Gun at Chatham Manor.  This stately mansion and plantation sits in Stafford County, VA, just across the Rappahannock river from downtown Fredericksburg.  It is here that in December 1862, commander of Union forces, General Burnside made Chatham his headquarters.  After Burnside's disastrous defeat at Fredericksburg, General Hooker took command of the Union forces, and he too used this home as his headquarters.
Lee Hill.  From this location on December 11, 1862, General Robert E. Lee made his headquarters at Telegraph Hill (now called Lee Hill). At 5:00am the loud booming of two cannons had notified the general that the Union army was crossing the Rappahannock River at Fredericksburg. Throughout the day, he watched as a brigade of Mississippi riflemen kept the Union army at bay along the water's edge.   Mike Lynaugh
The Sunken Road and the Stone wall of Fredericksburg.  This is the only remaining section of the original stone wall that helped the Confederate army give such a disastrous defeat to the Union army December 12, 1862.  Behind this wall, the Confederate army did something that had no army had ever done.... take up a defensive position and let an army come to it.  It worked masterfully.  Not a single Union soldier made it up to this position.  They were dealt one of the worst defeats of the war.   Mike Lynaugh