Antietam National Cemetery.  If you look closely you can see the size of the monument here at the cemetery....there is a woman laying down upon it.    Mike Lynaugh
Antietam in the spring.  Flowers bloom outside the entrance to the visitor's center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh
The Little Dunker Church in Antietam.  This church is located just across the street from the visitor center and is perhaps the most recognizable landmark at Antietam.  It was a staging ground for Stonewall Jackson's troops before battle, and then used as a hospital for the wounded after the fight.  During park hours it is usually open and you can walk around inside the church.   Mike Lynaugh
4th Pennsylvania Reserve (33nd) Volunteer Infantry Monument.   Mike Lynaugh
The Burnside Bridge.  This is site of one of the most ferocious fights here at Antietam.   Approximately 350 Confederates held off over 12,000 Union soldiers for approximately 3 hours and prevented them from crossing this bridge.  The Confederates eventually had to retreat, however, it was this long stand-off that prevented the Confederate army from being overwhelmed.   Mike Lynaugh
3rd Pennsylvania Reserve (32nd) Volunteer Infantry Monument.   Mike Lynaugh
The Robert E. Lee monument at Antietam.  This is located just outside the city limits along Route 34.   Mike Lynaugh
The fence along the Haggerstown Road.  It was here that Alexander Gardner took his famous photograph of the dead bodies along the fence.  These photographs where the first time the horrors of battle were captured on film and printed so that people back home could see.   Mike Lynaugh
"Bloody Lane" - it was here in the middle of the battlefield that the fiercest of all the fighting of the day occurred.  One eyewitness claimed that bodies laid here 3 deep for over a 1/2 mile.   Mike Lynaugh
September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in the American Civil War. More than 23,000 soldiers on either side were either killed, wounded, or listed as missing.  This is one of the many monuments honoring the sacrifice of soldiers from both the North and South here on the fields on the outskirts of Sharpsburg, MD.   Mike Lynaugh
8th Pennsylvania Reserve (37th) Volunteer Infantry Monument.   Mike Lynaugh
The fighting at Antietam was the most ferocious in the morning when Union soldiers begin to assault the Confederates right here in Miller's Cornfield.   Mike Lynaugh
Dunker Church - September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in the American Civil War. More than 23,000 soldiers on either side were either killed, wounded, or listed as missing. A significant part of the battle raged around the above building, the Mumma meetinghouse of the of the German Baptist Brethren, who were sometimes called "Dunkers."   Mike Lynaugh
One of the many monuments honoring the sacrifice of soldiers from both the North and South here on the fields on the outskirts of Sharpsburg, MD.   Mike Lynaugh
One of the many monuments honoring the sacrifice of soldiers from both the North and South here on the fields on the outskirts of Sharpsburg, MD.   Mike Lynaugh
The Irish Brigade Monument.   Mike Lynaugh
Antietam in the spring.  Flowers bloom outside the entrance to the visitor's center at Antietam National Battlefield.   Mike Lynaugh
The New York State Monument.   Mike Lynaugh
This was on the side of one of the gravestones in the National Cemetery at Antietam.   Mike Lynaugh
September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in the American Civil War. More than 23,000 soldiers on either side were either killed, wounded, or listed as missing.  This is a monument to the heroism of the 132nd Pennsylvania here at the "Bloody Lane."   Mike Lynaugh
The Pry House.  During the fighting of September 17, 1862, General George McClellan used this home as his headquarters.    Mike Lynaugh
A different looking monument to the 15th Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteers and their sacrifice here on the fields on the outskirts of Sharpsburg, MD.   Mike Lynaugh
September 17, 1862 was the bloodiest single day in the American Civil War. More than 23,000 soldiers on either side were either killed, wounded, or listed as missing.   Mike Lynaugh
The Burnside Bridge.  Here approximately 1,200 Confederates held off over 12,000 Union soldiers for approximately 1 hour and 40 minutes and prevented them from crossing this bridge.  The Confederates eventually had to retreat, however, it was this long stand-off that prevented the Confederate army from being overwhelmed.   Mike Lynaugh